Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Daiter Gallery’

MEMORY CITY BOOK PARTY: July 24

July 14, 2014

MC.Book_Party

 

MEMORY CITY is” both melancholy and charming, and show[s] a city mourning the business that sustained it, not without pride.” from the NEW STATEMAN, selected as the BOOK OF THE WEEK, 18 July 2014.

WORKSHOP UPDATE

DUE TO A LAST MINUTE CANCELLATION, THERE’S ONE SPOT LEFT: FINDING YOUR VISION: SAN FRANCISCO, SAT. AUG. 23 THRU WED. AUG. 27, 2014, Intersection for the Arts, 925 Mission Street, San Francisco: For more information: http://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAXO31_3&VBID=2K1HZOQ8FXV4N7&IID=2K1HRG5YJO83&PN=35

ONE SPOT LEFT: PHOTO PROJECT 2014, NYC, Sunday Oct. 26-Sat. Nov. 1, 2014. This intimate bookmaking workshop is open to only 10 photographers. To learn more, including how to apply click here. Or email Alex and Rebecca for more information: webbnorriswebb@gmail.com

OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24TH, SAN FRANCISCO: LECTURE AND BOOK SIGNING AT THE INTERSECTION FOR THE ARTS, 7:30-9PM, AN EVENT THAT’S FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, BOSTON: MEMORY CITY ARTIST RECEPTION AND BOOK SIGNING, ROBERT KLEIN GALLERY, 2-5PM

FRIDAY, OCT. 3: BOSTON: SLANT RHYMES: ALEX WEBB AND REBECCA NORRIS WEBB PHOTORAPHS, ARS LIBRI, 5-7PM, in conjunction with Boston First Fridays.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7: CHICAGO: MEMORY CITY ARTIST RECEPTION, STEPHEN DAITER GALLERY

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©Alex Webb, “St. Patrick’s Day,” from Memory City (with Rebecca Norris Webb), published in the 18 July 14 issue of New Statesman

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Memory City in ART News

February 17, 2014
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©Alex Webb, “Dancehall, Lake Ontario, Rochester, NY, 2013,” from “Memory City” (with Rebecca Norris Webb), Radius Books, late spring 2014

“Rochester, in upstate New York, has been the home of Kodak since the company’s start in 1888. When it declared bankruptcy in 2012, Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb decided to use film made by the company to shoot the city. For the project, Webb used his last rolls of Kodachrome, the famous but now-discontinued film, developing it as hazy black and white since its special color process is no longer available. The results look like any struggling but hopeful city, quiet but proud.”—Rebecca Robertson, ART News

http://www.artnews.com/2014/02/13/11-edgy-art-books-document-the-bizarre-bygone-and-adorable/

TO PRE-ORDER “MEMORY CITY” FROM RADIUS BOOKS (both trade edition and limited edition): 

http://radiusbooks.org/7430/alex-webb-rebecca-norris-webb-memory-city/

NEW WORKSHOP JUST ADDED: Finding Your Vision @ Fotografiska Museum, Stockholm, Saturday, June 7th-Wed. June 11, 2014:  http://fotografiska.eu/kurser/kurs/alex-webb-and-rebecca-norris-webb/

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©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Blue Secondhand Prom Dress, Rochester, NY, 2012,” from “Memory City” (with Alex Webb), Radius Books, late spring 2014

LINKS, REVIEWS, ARTICLES, WORKSHOPS, EXHIBITIONS AND MORE:

——Link to NEW YORK TIMES LENS blog Q&A with Jim Estrin & Alex and Mound Bayou slide show:

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/07/alex-webb-looks-back-in-black-and-white/?smid=tw-share

——ALEX’S PHOTOGRAPHS FROM INDIA’S KUMBH MELA IN FEBRUARY 2014 ISSUE:

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/02/kumbh-mela/spinney-text

——Saturday May 3 thru Friday May 10, FINDING YOUR VISION, NEW YORK.  ONLY ONE SPOT left in this annual workshop. For more information including how to enroll, please visit: 

https://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAXO31_3&VBID=2K1HZOQ8HF290Z&IID=2K1HRG8E8ABS&PN=3

——Friday, Dec. 13 thru Feb. 22, 2014: BEFORE THE SHIFT: The Early Black-and-White Work of Alex Webb, Lynne Cohen, Martin Parr, and Stephen Shore at at the Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago; opening reception with Alex, Friday, Dec. 13, 5:30-8pm:

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/exhibit_display.asp?EventID=2&Exhibit=Currrent&ExhibitID=175

 

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©Alex Webb, “Mound Bayou, Mississippi, 1976,” reprinted in the NYTimes Lens Blog

UNBOUND: My Dakota

March 19, 2012

Today we’re happy to announce that we’ve received the first varnished, unbound copy of Rebecca’s “My Dakota” book in the mail from the printer in Singapore.  Here’s a rough, home made video of Rebecca reading the first text piece in the book, “Lost & Loss.”  By mid April, we hope to have the first advanced copies of the book.––Alex Webb

SPRING  EVENTS 

––THURSDAY, MAY 24TH, 6-7:30 PM: “My Dakota” book launch, party and signing at ICP, 1133 Ave. of the Americas at 43d St.  Come join us to celebrate Rebecca’s new book.  I’m bringing the champagne!–Alex Webb

David Chickey, Rebecca, & Alex @ National Museum of Singapore, Q&A after slide talk, from the Invisible Photographer Asia blog

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBEBECCA

“This leads me to another very, very important aspect of photobook making: You’re almost always better off involving other people. Maybe you’re a genius, maybe you can do it all on your own. Chances are you are not. Actually, it’s very likely you’re not. And even if you are a genius, then you’re genius enough to know that you need to involve other people.”––Joerg Colberg, March 13, 2012,  Conscientious Extended

“Teaching taught me how little I knew and it forced me to think.  I had to teach to get an education.” –––Harry Callahan, from “Harry Callahan @ 100” at the National Gallery of Art

––WEEKEND WORKSHOP @ APERTURE, NY, Friday evening, March 23, thru Sat., March 25, 2012. Do you know where you’re going next with your photography –– or where it’s taking you?   An intensive weekend workshop with Alex and Rebecca. You can reserve a spot in the workshop at the Aperture Foundation website.  THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW SOLD OUT. 

––WEEKEND WORKSHOP IN MILANO @ FORMA; Friday evening, May 4, thru Sunday, May 6th, 2012.  An intensive weekend workshop @ Forma with the Webbs during Alex’s upcoming spring exhibition there, “The Suffering of Light.” Included in the workshop will be a gallery talk by Alex as well as a copy of Alex’s recent survey book of 30 years of his color photographs, “La Sofferenza della Luce,” (Contrasto).  The workshop will be taught in English with Italian translation.  For more information here’s the link.

––FINDING YOUR VISION WORKSHOP @ CAPTION GALLERY, BROOKLYN, NY.  Sunday May 20 thru Friday May 25, 2012.* A week-long photographing and editing workshop where each photographers begins to explore his or her own way of photographing and how to edit intuitively.  Will include exercises, light room tutorials, and a presentation by a noted book editor.  Check the workshop page of the webbnorriswebb website for fees, application process and further details.  Apply to this email: webbnorriswebb@gmail.com

MARCH LINKS

––Review of the new book,” Photographs Not Taken,”  in the Guardian, March 15, 2012

––Q&A with Alex and Rebecca Webb in the Invisible Photographer Asia blog

––“How to Make a Photobook,” JM Colberg, Conscientious Extended, March 13

––Alex and Rebecca on Aperture’s Exposures blog, March 21

©Rocel Ann Junio, Singapore Masterclass, 2012

SEPTEMBER EVENTS: Chicago, Boston, and Santa Fe

September 5, 2011

Alex Webb, “Nuevo Laredo, 1996,” from the book, “Crossings,” part of the Stephen Daiter Gallery exhibition this month

Hope you can join us for one of our three September events:  Alex’s opening for “The Suffering of Light” at the Stephen Daiter Gallery on Friday evening, September 9th from 5 to 8pm; our joint gallery exhibition, which includes work from our Cuba book and Museum of Fine Arts exhibition, “Violet Isle,” at the Robert Klein Gallery on Saturday afternoon, September 17th, from 2-4pm.

Lastly, please join us for our  joint slide talk and book signing   “Together and Apart,” including a conversation with Radius creative director and noted book designer, David Chickey, at RADIUS BOOKS in Santa Fe, Friday, Sept. 24th, from 5:30-7 pm, which will be held just before the CENTER’s panel of photography experts, including New Mexico Museum of Art curator, Katherine Ware, and Photo-Eye’s Melanie McWhorter, a talk which is located nearby.  Both the RADIUS and CENTER events are free and open to the public.

Please let us know if you can attend any of the events by posting a comment below. Looking forward to seeing some of you this month.––Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Rebecca Norris Webb, Havana, 2008, from VIOLET ISLE exhibitions this month at Robert Klein Gallery, Boston, and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

THREE UPCOMING OCTOBER EVENTS:  Hope to see some of you at Alex’s slide talk and conversation in Washington, D.C., at the Mexican Cultural Center, on Thursday, Oct. 6th; our joint slide talk in Oslo on Monday, October 10th: and at our talk and book signing at PowerHouse Books in Dumbo on Sunday, October 23d, at 5pm.  We’ll have links and details by the end of the month.––Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb

Rebecca Norris Webb, from the upcoming book, "My Dakota," (Radius, May 2012) and September 23d slide talk in Santa Fe (wtih Alex Webb & David Chickey at Radius Books)

WORKSHOP UPDATE: For those working on a long-term project, there are still a few spaces left for the BOOK WEEKEND WITH RADIUS BOOKS the third weekend in September, and the PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP the last week in October.  Former Webb workshop participants are invited to apply without submitting a formal application, but other photographers will be considered as well.  Please contact Rebecca for more information: rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com

Nancy Webb will be honored at the October 1st PAAM Gala

Nancy Webb, "Sunflowers"

TWO CONGRATULATIONS:  We’d like to congratulate Alex’s talented mother, NANCY WEBB, for being awarded a lifetime artist award at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.  Hope to see some of you there at the PAAM ARTrageous Celebration & Silent Auction on October 1st.  We’d also like to congratulate DIMITRI MELLOS –– whose PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP project last October, “Its Strangest Patterns” –– was awarded Blurb’s First Runner Up in the Travel Category.––Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Dimitri Mellos, Its Strangest Patterns

“My Dakota” Limited Ed., Radius Book Workshop

June 29, 2011

Rebecca Norris Webb, Fallen Apples, print option for "My Dakota" limited ed.

Before we head out to photograph for the summer — Alex south to Peru and Rebecca west to South Dakota — we just wanted to thank our online photographic community for all your support this past year.  And we’d like to give  a special thanks to all of you who have reserved one of the “My Dakota” limited editions, which will help Radius publish Rebecca’s book next spring.

In addition, we hope some of you can join us for the Book Weekend Workshop with Radius with Radius publisher and creative director, the acclaimed book designer David Chickey, and noted photo book expert, Radius book editor, and coauthor of the new book, Publish Your Photography Book, Darius Himes, in Santa Fe the third weekend in September this year. This intensive weekend workshop is a great way to explore what’s the next step for your long-term project as well as an additional way to support Rebecca’s “My Dakota” book.

Please stay in touch over the summer, and we hope to see some of you at Alex’s opening at the Stephen Daiter Gallery in Chicago on Friday, September 9th, and at our joint show at the Robert Klein Gallery in Boston on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 17th.  Looking forward to working with the photographers of our most advanced and intensive project workshop, Photo Project Workshop 2011 at Caption Gallerythe last week in October, that will culminate in a book dummy, a designed cover of the book, and a show at the Caption Gallery after the workshop.  (See below for more details; as of July 1, two places are left). —Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

“MY DAKOTA” LIMITED EDITION

Edition of 30 (first 25 @$500; last five @$900)

11×14 signed Type C print and signed, editioned book with one of Rebecca’s handwritten text pieces

As of July 1st, 22 of the limited editions have sold.  Thanks, everyone, for your generous support of Rebecca’s book. We couldn’t do it without you.  I’m about to send out the second round of emails.  If you haven’t yet heard from me, feel free to contact me directly to see the pdf of all eight print options (including the three in this blog posting). Thanks, again. — Alex  (my direct email: rnorriswebb@yahoo.com)

UPCOMING PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA:

––Book Weekend with Radius Books (and the Webbs):  Friday, Sept. 23, to Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011, Santa Fe, NM

–- The Photo Project Workshop: Sunday, Oct. 23, to Saturday, Oct. 29th, 2011, New York

All former Webb Workshop participants are invited to participate, but others will be considered as well.

Rebecca Norris Webb, Black Birds, print option for "My Dakota" limited ed.

Rebecca Norris Webb, Sheep Mountain, print option for "My Dakota" limited ed.

WEBBWORKS: Alex’s Book, Rebecca’s Poem

March 14, 2011

We’re back in Brooklyn, and wanted to give our TWO LOOKS online community the first glimpse of two new WebbWorks:  Alex’s first advance copy of his survey book, THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT, and a new poem Rebecca recently wrote on a ranch in South Dakota for her upcoming book, MY DAKOTA, which is a photographic elegy for her brother, Dave.   Again, we both apologize for our rough, at times out-of-focus homemade videos (Unfortunately, the IPOD touch doesn’t focus very precisely, not to mention Rebecca’s shivering hands in the -15 F Dakota blizzard.)

Alex’s book will be available May 1 from Aperture (US), Thames and Hudson (UK), Contrasto (Italy), and Textuel (France).  We will keep you posted about upcoming book signings and other events in May and June in New York, Madrid, London, Boston, and Charlottesville.—Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

FOTOFORUM: THE INDELIBLE IMAGE

December 7, 2009

We asked photographers this month to select an indelible image –– one photograph they encountered early on as a photographer that still lingers with them today.  We’re especially pleased to include an indelible image from Darius Himes, one of the country’s foremost experts on the photo book, who is also a photographer, writer, and publisher.  And thanks to everyone who submitted an indelible image. Because we had so many responses to the column, we’ll run THE INDELIBLE IMAGE II next month. –– Alex and Rebecca

DARIUS HIMES ON HARRY CALLAHAN

Harry Callahan, Aix-en-Provence, 1958

One of the first photographers I was introduced to, as a young teenage boy, was Harry Callahan. The introduction came by way of the cover of Henry Horenstein’s Black and White Photography. My father had purchased the book at the suggestion of a colleague, and while the technical language was still far above me, I was deeply impressed by the work chosen. Callahan’s graceful black-and-white image of barren trees in winter not only spoke to me due to the subject matter—I grew up just across the Mississippi River in Iowa, a mere 3 hours from Chicago, where I presume Callahan made this photograph—but also because of the graphic power of the world rendered in shades of black, white, and gray.

But the photograph of Callahan’s that I most responded to, then and now, is his photograph of 1958, Aix-en-Provence, France. Actually, that statement is a bit of a falsehood. There are so many photographs of Callahan’s that I respond to, that to narrow it to one particular image is like asking for a favorite passage from Shakespeare! There are so many that are appropriate for so many situations. But nonetheless, what moves me about this image is the wildness of the underbrush and the seeming impenetrability of the scene. And yet, the more you look, the more things are revealed, by which I mean, the more deeply it impresses itself upon you, untethering your own inner eye along the way. Merely informational facts are not what I’m talking about; what I’m hinting at are the multitude of ways that the outer world has been transformed into a powerful two dimensional, abstracted image. I’m talking about the very transformative power of photography in the hands of an acutely sensitive artist.

There is a concept that is a clarifying one for me that relates to my attraction to this photograph. In both Eastern and Western cosmology is the notion of the mirror-connectedness of the Book of Revelation and the Book of Creation. Here is one exemplary, brief passage that speaks to this subject, from Persian-born Baha’u’llah. “Look at the world and ponder a while upon it. It unveileth the book of its own self before thine eyes and revealeth that which the Pen of thy Lord, the Fashioner, the All-Informed, hath inscribed therein”* John Ruskin, the 19th century British writer and social commentator expressed it this way.

There is religion in everything around us,

a calm and holy religion

in the unbreathing things of nature.

It is a meek and blessed influence,

stealing in as it were unaware upon the heart;

It comes quickly, and without excitement;

It has no terror, no gloom,

It does not rouse up the passions;

It is untrammeled by creeds….

There are a great many photographers and artists who have approached the world around them with awe and wonder. In this image, I see a precursor to photographers like Hiroshi Sugimoto and Thomas Joshua Cooper, as well as echoes of artists as varied as Nio Hokusai, Kandinsky, and the darker aspects of Whistler’s painting oeuvre. What Callahan seems to have mastered, to me at least, was the ability to gaze, with deep intent, at his “immediate” surroundings, without feeling the need to either exoticize nor degrade what he looked at and what he ultimately decided to photograph, allowing “the book of its own self” to reveal itself in all of its own inherent beauty. This is a powerful role that the arts can play in our society and in helping us advance our fledgling, world-embracing civilization.––Darius Himes

* (Baha’u’llah: Tablets of Baha’u’llah, pp. 141-142)

Darius’s websites:

http://www.dariushimes.com

http://www.radiusbooks.org

For more about Harry Callahan:

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/artist.asp?ArtistID=25

To see Hiroshi Sugimoto’s work:

http://www.sugimotohiroshi.com/

To see some of Thomas Joshua Cooper’s work:

http://artnews.org/artist.php?i=735



ALEX WEBB ON HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Valencia, Spain, 1933

My father, when he was struggling with writer’s block––which, unfortunately, was all too often––turned to photography, and as a result had a fine collection of photographic books.  At about the age of fourteen, I started to sift through these books in his study.  As I pored through The Decisive Moment, I remember coming upon this Cartier-Bresson image from Valencia, Spain.  I’d never seen anything quite like it.     As I marveled at the echoing rings of the mismatched spectacle lenses and the half-target on the door, set against––in deep space––that slightly twisted, ambiguous figure in the doors behind, I remember thinking: How can someone see this way?  How can someone find such an enigmatic moment in the world and bring it back as a photograph? I began to sense something about perception, about the moment, about space, and about the unique possibilities of the photograph. I’ve never forgotten this image.––Alex Webb

To see more of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s work:

http://www.magnumphotos.com

REBECCA NORRIS WEBB ON WRIGHT MORRIS

Wright Morris, Clothing on Hooks, 1947

Formerly a writer, I was attracted early on as a photographer to two books that combine text and images:  Walker Evans and James Agee’s Let Us Now Praise Famous Men and Wright Morris’s God’s Country and My People. Both bodies of work expanded my way of looking at the photo book, and eventually led to my intermingling the two in my own work.  Yet, there was something about the lesser-known, Nebraskan-born Morris’s photo-text book –– in which he interweaves his writing and his photographs –– that touched something deeper and more inexplicable in me. Morris’s work is aloof yet engaging, bare-bones yet mysterious, spacious yet intimate –– it is work that suggests the many paradoxes that make up the Great Plains itself, where, like Morris, I also grew up,

I’m not sure exactly how his work manages to evoke all of this in me.  Perhaps it’s because Wright Morris’s objects are often photographed so sparely, yet with such intensity, it creates a kind of space around them.   And this space creates a kind of suggestiveness, ripe for poetic reverie in the viewer, not unlike the experience of driving across the Nebraska or South Dakota prairie with few if any trees or houses to fetter the mind, the memory, the imagination.  So, for me, Morris’s spare objects suggest the Great Plains –- like this photograph of the tattered coats and hat –– as well as evoking a different kind of landscape, a kind of private and interior Nebraska, one that suggests what all that emptiness feels like to an insider, someone who grew up on the Great Plains, and the Great Plains “…grew up in you,” to quote Morris.

And, lastly, there are his accompanying texts that somehow speak to –- or perhaps I should say, speak for –– the photos, texts that are as spare and distilled and intense as the photographs themselves.  I find the text pieces as plainspoken and mesmerizing and mysterious as a Weldon Kees poem, a poet who also grew up in Nebraska.  Reading Morris creates a kind of expansiveness in me, a kind of ache and a kind of delight, which is often my response to the Great Plains.  And, I’m not sure why, but as soon as I finish reading one of his more luminous pieces  (like the one I’ve included below), I find myself starting the process all over again –– a sign, they say, of truly poetic writing.––Rebecca Norris Webb

The man who lives his own life, and wears it out, can dispense with the need of taking it with him. He dies his own death or he goes on living, and where the life has worn in the death will come out. Skin and bones, jacket and shoes, tools, sheds and machines wear out; even the land wears out and the seat wears off the cane- bottom chair. The palms wear off the gloves, the cuffs off the sleeves, the nickel off the doorknobs, the plate off the silver, the flowers off the plates, the shine off the stovepipe, the label off the flour sacks, the enamel off the dipper, the varnish off the checkers, and the gold off the Christmas jewelry, but every day the nap wears off the carpet the figure wears in. A pattern for living, the blueprint of it, can be seen in the white stitches of the denim, the timepiece stamped like a medallion in the bib of the overalls. Between wearing something in and wearing it out the line is as vague as the receding horizon, and as hard to account for as the missing hairs of a brush. The figure that began on the front of the carpet has moved around to the back.––Wright Morris

For more about Wright Morris:

http://monet.unk.edu/mona/first/morris/morris.html

For more about Weldon Kees (including my favorite poem of his “1926”):

http://mockingbird.creighton.edu/Ncw/kees.htm