Posts Tagged ‘Southeast Museum of Photography’

NEW WORKSHOP ADDED: Miami in January

November 11, 2013
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©Rebecca Norris Webb, from “Violet Isle and My Dakota” at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona, FL, thru Feb. 2; also in “Together and Apart: The Photographs of Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb” at the Leica Store Miami, which opens Dec. 3

FINDING YOUR VISION with Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

WEEKEND WORKSHOP @ LEICA STORE MIAMI, Friday evening January 17 thru Sunday afternoon  January 19, 2014

Do you know where you’re going next with your photography –– or where it’s taking you?  This intensive weekend workshop will help photographers begin to understand their own distinct way of seeing the world.  It will also help photographers figure out their next step photographically  –– from deepening their own unique vision to the process of discovering and making a long-term project that they’re passionate about, as well as the process of how long-term projects evolve into books and exhibitions. A workshop for serious amateurs and professionals alike, it will taught by Alex and Rebecca, a creative team who often edit projects and books together –– including their joint book and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibition, “Violet Isle: A Duet of Photographs from Cuba,” Alex’s recent Aperture book, “The Suffering of Light,” Rebecca’s new third book, “My Dakota,” and their upcoming joint book on Rochester, film and time, “Memory City.”

Included in the workshop will be an editing exercise as well as an optional photography assignment or long-term project review. 

Space is limited.  For more information and to enroll online: http://www.leicastoremiami.com/collections/workshops-classes-and-trips/products/alex-webb-rebecca-norris-webb-workshop-finding-your-vision-fri-sat-sun-jan-17-19-2014

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE:

––Friday: 7:00-8:30pm: “Together and Apart: The Photographs of Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb,” Alex and Rebecca’s gallery talk/walk through of the exhibition @ Leica Store Miami followed by Q&A.  This event is open to the public.

––Sat. and Sunday:  9:30-5:30 pm: Workshop

©Alex Web

©Alex Webb, Havana, 2008, from “Violet Isle and My Dakota” at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona, FL, thru Feb. 2

“Our landscapes contain every part of us, Webb seems to say, the broken and the whole.”—Scott Gast, Orion Magazine review of “My Dakota,” November/December 2013 issue

OTHER UPCOMING WORKSHOPS, EXHIBITIONS, AND TALKS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA:

——Saturday May 3 thru Friday May 10, FINDING YOUR VISION, NEW YORK.  For more information including how to enroll, please visit: 

http://www.webbnorriswebb.co/#mi=4&pt=0&pi=3

——Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 thru Feb. 2, 2014, “My Dakota” and “Violet Isle” at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona, FL:

“Violet Isle”: 

http://www.smponline.org/ex_webb_violet.html#.Unzv1I3z0XQ

“My Dakota”: 

http://www.smponline.org/ex_webb_dakota.html#.UlVhFBZqN4Y

PUBLIC TALKS IN DECEMBER:  Tuesday, Dec. 3, at the Leica Store Miami and Thursday, Dec. 5th at the Miami Street Photography Festival

LE MONDE: Klapisch on Webb

September 2, 2013
©Alex Webb, Havana, from "Violet Isle," January 2013 Workshop

©Alex Webb, Havana, from “Violet Isle,” (with Rebecca Norris Webb)

“Life is accidental, nonlinear, heterogeneous, plural. However, when you write a story or make a film, you must try to find geometry and temporality to make appear linear what is not.

Narration and composition of an image are often victims of this paradox, which is so difficult to resolve. The artist seeks to represent life, which is messy and full of clutter, but to do so, the scene must be organized without completely falling into chaos. For my film Chinese Puzzle, Alex Webb was a guide to try to resolve this paradox. “——French cinematographer Cedric Klapisch in Le Monde

“La vie est par nature hétérogène, plurielle, non linéaire, accidentelle. Pourtant, quand on écrit une histoire ou compose une photo, on doit ranger, cadrer, trouver une géométrie et une temporalité pour rendre linéaire ce qui ne l’est pas.

La narration, la mise en scène et la composition d’une image sont souvent victimes de ce paradoxe, très difficile à résoudre. L’artiste cherche à représenter la vie, qui est pleine de désordre mais, pour le faire, il faut l’organiser sans la dénaturer. Pour mon film Casse-tête chinois, Alex Webb a été un guide pour tenter de résoudre ce paradoxe.”—French cinematographer Cedric Klapisch in Le Monde

To read the rest of the interview with noted French cinematographer Klapisch: http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article/2013/08/15/les-couleurs-du-chaos_3462085_3246.html

©Alex Web

©Alex Webb, “Havana, 2007” from “Violet Isle” (with Rebecca Norris Webb)

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS & EXHIBITIONS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA:

——Monday, Dec. 2-Friday, Dec. 6, 2013, Miami, FINDING YOUR VISION @ MIAMI STREET PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL during ART BASEL MIAMI and the other art fairs. For more information visit the Workshop page of the festival:

http://www.miamistreetphotographyfestival.org/#!alex-webb-workshop/c8kn

——Sat. Sept. 21, Santa Fe, NM, RADIUS BOOKS ARTIST PARTY, 5-8pm, at the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market. Book Sale, Sign-a-Thon, Video Shorts (including “Memory City”), and Silent Auction with Alex and Rebecca and some 50 other Radius artists including Sam Abell, Mark Klett, Stephen Dupont, David Taylor, Sharon Core, Charles Ross, Sharon Harper, Barbara Bosworth, John Gossage, Terry Evans, and  Julie Blackmon.

——Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 thru Feb. 2, 2014, “My Dakota” and “Violet Isle” at the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona, Florida; artist talk, book signing, and opening reception with Alex and Rebecca on Friday, Oct. 18th, 6-8pm:

http://www.smponline.org/lectures.html#.UiS0jBbB50A

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©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Badlands” from “My Dakota” at Southeast Museum of Photography, Oct. 18, 2013-Feb. 2, 2014

The photographer and poet grew up in South Dakota and sees the state’s landscape through the lens of grief for a brother who died. But that fact is not immediately apparent in these big, strong color photographs of sprinting deer, drooping sunflowers, and wide-open spaces. They offer an insider’s view, full of personal history, much of which remains coded. “Does loss have its own geography?” Webb has written on one of the gallery walls, and her camera circles the question obsessively, whether landing on a barbed-wire fence trailing torn plastic bags or a buffalo, glimpsed in a side-view mirror. Through Aug. 17.—from The New Yorker, Aug. 12 &19 issue