Posts Tagged ‘Norway’

FOUR CONTINENTS: 17 Photographers

December 21, 2010

We invited photographers we’ve met in workshops around the world — and through this blog — to help us celebrate the holidays by posting a photograph and giving us an update about their work.  So here are images from 17 photographers from FOUR CONTINENTS around the world.

To everyone in our online photographic community, we’d like to wish you a holiday season filled with joy and love. –– Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Matthew Goddard-Jones, New York, 2010

 

Congratulations to Australian photographer, MATTHEW GODDARD-JONES, whose above photograph was a finalist for a National Geographic prize.  Matt took this photograph during our Master Class this past May in New York.

Matthew Goddard-Jones website

Bill McCullough

Austin-based photographer, BILL MCCULLOUGH, often finds moments on the edges of the weddings he photographs professionally — and passionately, too.  “I love and am obsessed with what I do,” says Bill, who is also a musician. The above is from his limited edition book, “Technicolor Life: American Wedding,’ which you can peruse (and order!) online.

Bill McCullough website

Wenjie Yang, "Low City" exhibition

Chinese photographer, WENJIE YANG — who some of you know as “BaiBai” from the Oslo Magnum Workshop — has been quite busy working on personal projects as well as photographing for clients since she graduated recently from the ICP photography program.  For those in New York, be sure and visit her current exhibition, “Low City, Photographs from Chongqing,” at the Chinese-American Arts Council in Manhattan’s Chinatown.

Wenjie Yang website

Wenjie Yang blog

Magdalena Sole, from her upcoming book, "New Delta Rising"

New York-based photographer, MAGDALENA SOLE (who some of you know from the Magnum New York Workshop or the Venice Workshop), is finishing her first book of photographs, which is about the Mississippi Delta.  Called “New Delta Rising,” the book will be released next year by the Dreyfus Health Foundation and distributed by the University of Mississippi Press.  It includes a essay by southern writer, Rick Bragg, and was one of those rare books by another photographer that we chose to edit this year.  You’ll read more about Magdalena’s book next year on this blog, after it’s released.

Magdalena Sole website.

Lisen Stibeck, Palestinian refugee camp, Beirut, Lebanon, 2010

Swedish photographer, LISEN STIBECK, is working on a recent project that has taken her to this refugee camp on the outskirts of Beirut (above), as well as to other struggling neighborhoods around the globe, including those in Syria, Lebanon, and, next year, Mexico.  Lisen’s project arose from the work she’s been doing at an orphanage in Marrakesh, where she is currently mentoring teenaged girls.

Lisen Stibeck’s website

Alessandro Marchi

Italian photographer, ALESSANDRO MARCHI, who some of you met in the Lucca Workshop, has photographs that will be exhibited as part of the Format International Photography Festival from March 4, 2011- to April, 3, 2011, in Derby, UK.   Here is a link to the series that will be shown called, “Floating Between Possible Breakdowns.”

You can also see a multimedia presentation of his work from another project, DZMK, in which Alessandro has been photographing many of the workers in a steel factory in southeastern Kazakhstan.

Alessandro Marchi website

Dimitri Mellos, New York, 2010

Above is an image from a long-term street photography project by Greek photographer, DIMITRI MELLOS, on New York City, called “Its Strangest Patterns,” a title inspired by a wonderful quote by novelist Joseph O’Neill.  Some of you met Dimitri at either the Magnum New York Workshop or the first Photo Project Workshop in Dumbo, Brooklyn, this past fall.  We will feature more from his project on the blog next year in an upcoming UNBOUND column.

Dimitri Mellos website

Tone Elin Solholm, cover of her new book, "The Giants' Living Room"

Norwegian designer and photographer, TONE ELIN SOLHOLM — from both the Venice and Barcelona workshops — had her new book, “The Giants’ Living Room,” featured in a recent NEW BOOK column on the blog, a book with a prose poem written by Rebecca called, “Remember When the World Had Seven Rooms…”  To see more images from Tone’s book — and to order a copy of the trade edition or the limited edition of the book — visit Tone’s website below.

Tone Elin Solholm website

Yvonne Liu, Toronto, 2010

Some of you met Chinese photographer, YVONNE LIU, at the Toronto Magnum Workshop in May this past year, in which she took the above photograph.  Although relatively new to photography, Yvonne’s enthusiasm and grace and compassion inspired many of us who have been photographing much longer.   She’s currently working on a new project in Tibet, and will be, we’re sure, an invaluable member of our upcoming Hong Kong Workshop in January.

Yvonne Liu website

Shea Naer

LA-based photographer, SHEA NAER, from our New York Master Class last May in Dumbo, had seven portraits from her series, “Pugilists” published in the NYC journal, Canteen, this past summer.  This coincided with a group exhibition, which included some of this same work, at the powerHouse Arena in Brooklyn last August.

Shea Naer website

David Bacher, Sud Tirol, 2010

“At least once a year I visit the South Tirol, which is the area where my father was born. It is like a pilgrimage back to his roots and mine as well, as my parents often took me there when I was growing up. This past October I spent a week near the town of Brixen with my father. One of the neighboring valleys is called the Vilnösstal. It is where the mountaineer Rheinhold Messner grew up and is the location of one of the most famous and breathtaking massifs in the Dolomites, the “Geislergebiet.”

Being near the mountain fills me with an overwhelming source of energy, purpose, and place. It is the most beautiful place I know.” — David Bacher

David Bacher website

Francois Dagenais

Canadian cinematographer and photographer, FRANCOIS DAGENAIS, currently has work included in three group exhibitions in the U.S., including “HumanKind,” a juried invitational photo exhibition at the powerHouse Arena that opened on December 17th, and “Scene on the Street: Photos from Public Places,” at the Vermont Photo Space Gallery, an exhibition which was curated by National Geographic photographer and VII member, Ed Kashi.

Francois Dagenais website

Justin Partyka, Isleham, Cambridgeshire, 2010

“This year I was commissioned by the publishers Full Circle Editions to produce a new photo essay to appear in their reissue of the classic oral history collection ‘Fenwomen,’ first published by Virago in 1975.

The essay I have produced, ‘Black Fen they call it….’ (taken from the first line of the book) was made in and around the village of Isleham in the Cambridgeshire Fens, where the oral history was originally collected by the author Mary Chamberlain. Twenty-three photographs will be featured in the book.

The book went to press on 29 November, and will be available in January. A series of events and exhibitions are currently being planned for 2011. Details of the book are available from the publishers website, where the book can also be ordered.”–Justin Partyka

Justin Partyka website

Thomas Lindahl Robinson, Cuba

THOMAS LINDAHL ROBINSON is continuing to work on his long-term project on Cuba, and the above photograph is from this series.  Thomas is also working on a project on China, which is not yet up on the website below, as well as blogging.

Thomas Lindahl Robinson website

Thomas Lindahl Robinson blog

Steinar Haugland, cover of his Blurb book, "Aloneliness"

Norwegian photographer, STEINAR HAUGLAND, who some of you met during the Venice Workshop, has published his first Blurb book, “Aloneliness,” and you’ll find the cover above.

Steinar Haugland Blurb book, Aloneliness

Uwe Schober

“This summer in Spain, I have been working on a series that I have named ‘Perturbadora Pasión | Disturbing Passion | After Francisco Zurbarán.’ The idea came when I was walking through the streets of Barcelona at night and saw all the homeless people sleeping in church entrances, on benches, shops and restaurants. The characteristically yellow light reminded me of Goya and especially of Zurbarán. So I decided to photograph the homeless in just that way with a reference to Spanish masters of the 17th century – not to mock the homeless, quite the opposite: to give them a different voice.  I will exhibit part of the series in a group exhibition this winter in the ‘atelier freier fotografen’ in Berlin.”–Uwe Schober

Uwe Schober’s website

David Belay, Istanbul, 2010

 

“I was drawn to Istanbul both by Alex’s book and by the many things I had heard about Istanbul from so many different people. I found a city that is so complex and multifaceted that, in my opinion, the best way to try and capture its spirit is just to ‘sample’ it, as in this wonderful enumeration of places, moments, etc. in the essay by Orhan Pamuk featured at the end of Alex’s book. It seems to me that a collection of pictures is just the visual equivalent of that, and therefore that photography is a great medium to approach this unique city.”–David Belay

To see more of David Belay’s photographs

NEW BOOK: The Giants’ Living Room

December 5, 2010

Rebecca and I are very pleased to announce the publication of The Giants’ Living Room by Tone Elin Solholm, a Norwegian photographer and designer who took our workshops in Venice and Barcelona.  Her work –– with the distinctive clarity of its whites and darks and its simultaneous warmth and leanness –– seems to me particularly Scandinavian.  The tones make me think of Bergman’s films — with the cinematography of Sven Nykvist and Gunnar  Fischer.  But, whereas Bergman’s films often seethe with impending doom, Tone’s work only hints at the ominous.  Instead, her lyrical work is suffused with a sense of familial warmth and love, and only occasionally tempered by a cooler note, just enough to remind us that childhood has its own terrors.

Rebecca and I were very pleased to work with Tone on the editing and sequencing of The Giants’ Living Room.  We were especially taken with how her minimalist book design echos the spareness of her photographs.  And Rebecca, who was asked by Tone to contribute a poem last spring, was surprised and delighted that Tone’s work inspired the following prose poem.––Alex Webb

Tone Elin Solholm, cover of "The Giants' Living Room"

Rebecca Norris Webb, prose poem in the book, 'The Giants' Living Room"

Tone Elin Solholm from “The Giants’ Living Room”

Tone Elin Solholm from "The Giants' Living Room"

Tone Elin Solholm from "The Giants' Living Room"

THE GIANTS’ LIVING ROOM is available in both a trade edition of 500 copies (US $39 plus shipping) and a limited edition of boxed books (10 in the edition) that come with two signed prints (24 cm, which is 9.4 inches, on the longest dimension) and costs US$ 350.  To order books, please email Tone at the following email: tone@kairosworks.no

 

Tone Elin Solholm, back cover of “The Giants’ Living Room”


TWO LOOKS: Laara Matsen and Jonas Bendiksen

January 20, 2010

Since Rebecca and I are traveling next week, we decided to post this month’s TWO LOOKS column a few days early.  For January, we’re featuring the work of LAARA MATSEN, a U.S. photographer who also works as a curator and photo editor, and JONAS BENDIKSEN, Magnum’s sole Norwegian photographer. These married photographers have been together for about as long as we have, and, like Rebecca and myself, have worked on photographic books and exhibitions together, including Jonas’s two books, Satellites, his seven-year journey through the isolated communities on the fringes of the former Soviet Union, and his most recent book, The Places We Live, in which he documents the fragile dwellings of the poor in four of the most overcrowded cities in the world. Former New Yorkers, Laara and Jonas now live near Oslo with their son Milo, which is unfortunate for all of us who miss the couple’s warmth, insights, and humor, but lucky for the Norwegian photographic community.––Alex Webb

LAARA ON JONAS’S PHOTOGRAPH

Jonas Bendiksen, Birobidzhan bus stop, 1999

When Jonas and I met in January 1998, he was preparing to move to the Russian Far East for a year to begin his first long-term photographic project. By August he was there, and on New Year’s Eve, 1999, I landed in Siberia for what was, in all practical senses, our fourth date. The story he was chasing there was subtle: the disappearance of a forgotten community. There wasn’t actually much happening in Birobidzhan, but each morning he would slip out of bed and go out into the deeply sub-frozen predawn to shoot, returning with numb hands a few hours later. I always stayed warm under the covers. He shot mostly slides, and there was no reliable photo lab in the small town, so the results of his labor remained unseen until I brought seven months worth of film back to New York for processing.

I spent many hours over the next three months holding his slides up to the window of my tiny Brooklyn apartment waiting to see him again. This image was one of my favorites then, and remains so after 11 years. Three people waiting for the bus in the cold. Simple. But also ambiguous, humorous, cinematically lovely, and an astute translation of the complex and elusive Russianness that I knew he had been hunting over there. More personally, it stood as concrete proof of the parts of Jonas that most fascinated me (and still do): his solid patience, keen awareness of nuance, and good Norwegian ability to tolerate ungodly cold.–– Laara Matsen

Laara is in the process of building a website.

JONAS ON LAARA’S PHOTOGRAPH

Laara Matsen, "Ghost Man," Brooklyn, 1999

When Laara and I first got together, I moved into her tiny studio apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. We used to sit out on the window ledge in the evenings, airing the tiny space out and watching people go by. It was my first real meeting with New York, and I remember that summer as a magical time. New York seemed so full of promise. I was fresh in photography, and New York was like a big cake made of things that could happen, and we were eating it.

Laara had taken this picture from the windows of our place. Just the fact that it was taken from that one spot makes it special to me. It was our first view, from our first window. But it’s the guy in the street, bleached dazzling white by the headlights of two trucks, that always grabs me. He always made me think of a blank slate. Like someone who had shed their skin, and was looking for a new one –  looking for who he was or maybe who he should be. Looking back at that time, I think that’s how I felt, sitting on that window ledge, wondering what the future would hold.

Also, I think what I love about the picture is that it’s this otherworldly moment taken without actually leaving our house. Just a fleeting moment, that probably nobody else in the world saw except her. A good reminder that if one is open enough, magic can appear at any moment in the day, wherever you look.––Jonas Bendiksen

Jonas’s photographs on the Magnum website.


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