Posts Tagged ‘New York Times Lens Blog’

MEMORY CITY: TIME and NY TIMES

June 24, 2014

AlexWebbFairport.FB

 

 

“When Alex Webb was photographing at the Seabreeze Amusement Park in Rochester, N.Y., a man turned to the Magnum photographer, looked at his digital Leica and said: “You know, I designed the sensor for that camera.”

…Today’s Kodak bears little resemblance to the cultural and technological icon it once was. At its peak, Kodak controlled 90 percent of the film photography market, with sales reaching $10 billion. By 2012, when that number had shrunk to $3.5 billion, Kodak entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, sold off its digital sensor division and exited the one business on which it built its brand: film photography.”—Olivier Laurent, from “Memory City: A Eulogy for Rochester, Kodak’s Company Town,” on Time LightBox

 

Read more: ‘Memory City’: A Eulogy for Rochester, Kodak’s Company Town – LightBox
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©Alex Webb, “Dancehall, Lake Ontario,” from “Memory City” with Rebecca Norris Webb, Radius Books, June 2014

“…[I]f every book has its own music — a big book is perhaps like a symphony, a small one like a sonata — ‘Memory City’s’ music would be at times rough and dissonant, at other times melodic, but ultimately bluesy and soulful, reflecting our sense of — and affection for — this complicated and troubled city.”—Alex Webb from the NYTimes Lens Blog interview with Rebecca Norris Webb by Jim Estrin Read more: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/24/in-kodak-alex-webb-rochester-rebecca-norris-webb-photos-memory/
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©Rebecca Norris Webb, “New Mother Brienna,” from “Memory City” (with Alex Webb), Radius Books, June 2014

UPCOMING MEMORY CITY EVENTS

—MEMORY CITY exhibiton at Gallery R, June 18-July 3, 2014, in conjuction with the Visual Studies Workshop Photo-BookWorks Symposium in Rochester, NY. Public lecture at VSW (ticketed event , see below) on Thursday, June 26at 6pm, followed by exhibition reception and book signing @ Gallery R: 7:30-9:30pm. For more information: http://vsw.org/MemoryCity.php

 

—MEMORY CITY BOOK PARTY at Ricco/Maresca Gallery, 529 W. 20th, 3d Floor, on Thursday, July 24, from 6-8pm, a book launch and signing in conjunction with Radius Books and the Chelsea Art Walk. For more information: http://www.riccomaresca.com or http://radiusbooks.org/7430/alex-webb-rebecca-norris-webb-memory-city/

MC_Book_Cover_flat.72

 

 

TWO LOOKS: NYTimes, Nat’l Geographic

February 11, 2014
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©Alex Webb, Mound Bayou, Mississippi, 1976

Q. Jim Estrin, New York Times Lens Blog:

Had you ever been to Mississippi before? Was it similar to anything you had seen before or different?

A.  Alex Webb:

It was my first trip to Mississippi. I had photographed in some small towns in Alabama prior to visiting Mound Bayou; however, those towns were segregated — unlike Mound Bayou, there were no black town officials, no black police officers, and if there were black-owned businesses, they were in the black part of town.

Visiting Mound Bayou for the first time, I was completely unprepared for the intensity of the emotional experience of being welcomed and embraced by a culture so different than my own. I recall one moment when Ellie, the woman whom I first met at Smitty’s, suddenly turned to me, reached up and put her two hands on either side of my head and said, “I ain’t never touched the hair of a white man before.” Needless to say, as a young, white kid from Cambridge, Mass., I was stunned and deeply moved.

Link to read the rest of the Q&A with Jim Estrin and see the complete Mound Bayou slide show:

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/07/alex-webb-looks-back-in-black-and-white/?smid=tw-share

ALEX’S PHOTOGRAPHS FROM INDIA’S KUMBH MELA IN FEBRUARY 2014 ISSUE:

 

 

 

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/02/kumbh-mela/spinney-text

 

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©Alex Webb, Kumbh Mela in February 2014 issue of National Geographic Magazine

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS, EXHIBITIONS,  AND TALKS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA:

——Saturday May 3 thru Friday May 10, FINDING YOUR VISION, NEW YORK.  A few spots left in this annual workshop. For more information including how to enroll, please visit: 

https://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=CMS3&VF=MAXO31_3&VBID=2K1HZOQ8HF290Z&IID=2K1HRG8E8ABS&PN=3

——Friday, Dec. 13 thru Feb. 22, 2014: BEFORE THE SHIFT: The Early Black-and-White Work of Alex Webb, Lynne Cohen, Martin Parr, and Stephen Shore at at the Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago; opening reception with Alex, Friday, Dec. 13, 5:30-8pm:

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/exhibit_display.asp?EventID=2&Exhibit=Currrent&ExhibitID=175

 

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©Rebecca Norris Webb, Junipers, from A Field Guide to Silence

A shelter

or a ship

these junipers?

 

A black bough flies into the night.

Now even the snow

is the shadow of an owl.

—Rebecca Norris Webb, from “A Field Guide to Silence”

RADIUS SCHOLARSHIP: Judges Announced

January 28, 2013
Alex Webb

©Alex Webb, “Havana, 2013″

Judges have just been announced for the RADIUS BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS : James Estrin from the The New York Times Lens Blog,  Stacey D. Clarkson from Harper’s Magazine, photographer David Taylor, University of Arizona faculty and 2008 Guggenheim Fellow, and the Editors of Radius Books.  These tuition-free scholarships will be awarded to photographers who are 27 years old or younger to attend the BOOK WEEKEND @ RADIUS WORKSHOP in Santa Fe in March.  

DEADLINE FOR THE SCHOLARSHIP IS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22.  For more information about the scholarship and the upcoming workshop (only a few space left), please read about the workshop and scholarship below.—Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

PLEASE NOTE OUR WEBSITE HAS CHANGED:  http://www.webbnorriswebb.co/

ALEX FEATURED ON THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG

FLAK Q&A ON THE MAKING OF “MY DAKOTA” WITH RADIUS BOOKS EDITORS 

Rebecca

©Rebecca Norris Webb, from “Violet Isle” (with Alex Webb)

BOOK WEEKEND@RADIUS: Alex Webb, Rebecca Norris Webb, & David Chickey

Friday evening, March 22, 2013 thru Sunday afternoon, March 24, 2013, Radius Books offices, 227 Place Ave., Suite W., Santa Fe, NM

——28 JANUARY UPDATE: ONLY A FEW PLACES LEFT IN THE WORKSHOP: PLEASE CONTACT THE WEBBS TO RESERVE A SPACE. SEE DETAILS BELOW.

This intensive weekend bookmaking workshop is open to anyone who is passionate about a photography project that he or she has been working on –– from serious amateurs to seasoned professionals, from documentary photographers to art photographers, from those photographing a theme, a place, or an issue to those working on a more personal series of photographs of family or friends. This workshop will help each participant learn how to take his or her project to the next level.

The workshop will be taught by Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb, a creative team who’ve edited seven books together — including Rebecca’s My Dakota, Alex’s The Suffering of Light, and their joint books Violet Isle and the upcoming Memory City —and by noted designer David Chickey, Radius’s publisher and creative director who has designed photo books for more than 20 publishers and museums over the last 15 years.

Through an individual assignment tailored for each participant, presentations, discussions, and an editing exercise, the Webbs and Chickey will explore with you a variety of book-related topics over this intensive weekend, including such issues as how to discover the heart of your photography project, how to edit and sequence a photo book intuitively, how to figure out what’s left to photograph for your project, how to choose a writer, title and cover image, how to work with a designer, what to expect when you go on press, and how prints in a book differ from prints on a wall.

To apply: photographers must submit 10 small jpgs (72 dpi, 8 inches on longest side) or a link to your project online, and a short statement about the project (no more than 250 words), as a word doc to the Webbs: webbnorriswebb@gmail.com Former Webb Workshop participants are invited to apply without submitting a formal application if Alex and Rebecca are familiar with your project. IF YOU ARE 27 OR YOUNGER AND WISH TO APPLY FOR A TUITION-FREE RADIUS BOOKS SCHOLARSHIP, PLEASE NOTE THIS IN YOUR APPLICATION, AND INCLUDE A SHORT BIO AND TWO NAMES AND EMAILS OF PEOPLE FAMILIAR WITH YOUR WORK (SUCH AS PROFESSORS OR EDITORS) THAT THE JUDGES MAY WANT TO CONTACT.

For more information about the workshop, please contact Alex and Rebecca: webbnorriswebb@gmail.com, or visit the Magnum website.

OTHER UPCOMING 2013 WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA

——MAY 4-10, 2013: FINDING YOUR VISON @ CAPTION GALLERY, NY.  APPLICATIONS FOR THIS WORKSHOP OPEN ON JANUARY 22, 2013.  For more information about this workshop, visit Alex and Rebecca’s workshop page on their website:  http://www.webbnorriswebb.co/

 

 EXHIBITIONS
——FEB. 2.,  7-10PM, ATLANTA, 112 KROG ST. NE at Atlanta’s Stoveworks Complex, “SOAR,” a group show featuring the work of Rebecca Norris Webb, Jason Houston, and others.  After Feb. 2, the show will hang in the Jennifer Schwartz Gallery space until the end of February.  More information here.

——DEC. 14, 2012 – MAY 4, 2013, Salt Lake, Utah, Brigham Young University of Art, “The Suffering of Light: 30 Years of Photographs, Alex Webb’s solo traveling exhibition organized by the Aperture Foundation, NYC.

——NOV. 8 2012-JAN. 27, 2012, LONDON, “CARTIER-BRESSON: A QUESTION OF COLOR,” group exhibition with Alex Webb, Trent Parke, Joel Meyerwitz, Harry Gruyaert, Helen Levitt, Saul Leiter and others, an exhibition curated by William Ewing.

LINKS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA:
“MY DAKOTA” ONE OF TIME’S BEST PHOTO BOOKS OF 2012.
 
LINK TO THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG Q&A WITH REBECCA ABOUT “MY DAKOTA”

LINK TO NOTES ON “THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT’ BY ALEX WEBB ON TIME LIGHTBOX.

LINK TO “MY DAKOTA” ON TIME LIGHTBOX.

LINK TO ALEX’S EAST LONDON PHOTOGRAPHS IN THE AUGUST 2012 ISSUE OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC.

TO READ THE  FRACTION MAGAZINE REVIEW of MY DAKOTA CLICK HERE.

“LOOKING AT THE LAND” IN AMERICAN PHOTO MAGAZINE.

MY DAKOTA: Photo-Eye and Fraction

August 14, 2012

 

“This book of words and images is beautifully sad, sadly beautiful…The words and images work together to weave a deeper reading.

Looking for glimpses of the dead is not a new kind of quest in photography — we’ve been trying to make “spirit photographs” since the medium began. How Webb succeeds is through metaphor and symbol, which reveal themselves slowly as the pages turn. Her great loss is hidden in complex images that take several viewings to understand. They convey not just three but four dimensions.

On this journey through re-membered territory, the photographs illustrate the psychological and spiritual realities of the place. The barren land that is the Dakotas appears first, starting with the dust jacket image, a view of the Badlands through the greenish tint of a partially opened car window. Some patches of grass stubbornly cling to the sandy foreground, leading us to the striped mountains miles beyond. The frontispiece is of a buffalo glimpsed through a sideview mirror, seen as if on the other side of time. The Wild West, indeed.”—an excerpt from Ellen Wallenstein’s review of “My Dakota” in Fraction Magazine, August 2012

TO READ THE  COMPLETE FRACTION MAGAZINE REVIEW CLICK HERE.

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Rearview Mirror,” from the book, “My Dakota”

 

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “State Map,” from the book, “My Dakota”

“…The book is not wrapped in nostalgia. Its strength lies in the layered photographs where Norris Webb is looking for something in the distance, but what it is is not clear. It could be a memory. There is something between her and what is out there. Reflections and windows play an important role in layering the images with mystery and a sense of disconnectedness. Each photograph is open to interpretation and that room allows the reader to find their own memory of loss to complete it. The language of Norris Webb’s photographs is personal, but universal.

As an object the book has an intimate feel to it. It is sized 11½x9¾”, which forces one to bring the book closer. South Dakota is a land of open spaces and that feeling is repeated in the book with the use of white space and blank pages. The photographs are given room to breathe, to let the pain have space. One of the strongest elements of the book is the use of Norris Webb’s handwriting in pencil. It adds to the feeling of a journal. Her unique penmanship streams across pages connecting the pictures to her personal narrative. The handwriting and the photograph printed on the cover are extra details that set Radius Books apart from other publishers. 

Norris Webb sets the book up as an elegy for her brother. The sense of loss is palatable, but it feels like a love poem for the land and for her brother. It is a not a South Dakota that can be found on any map. It exists only in the book and comes through clearly.”—TOM LEININGER, an excerpt from his Photo-Eye review of “My Dakota”

TO READ THE COMPLETE PHOTO-EYE REVIEW CLICK HERE.

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “High Winds,” from the book, “My Dakota”

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA

––Friday Oct. 12 thru Sunday Oct. 14: Boston: Weekend Workshop, produced by the Robert Klein Gallery  Do you know where you’re going next with your photography –– or where it’s taking you?  This intensive weekend workshop will help photographers begin to understand their own distinct way of seeing the world.  It will also help photographers figure out their next step photographically  –– from deepening their own unique vision to the process of discovering and making a long-term project that they’re passionate about, as well as the process of how long-term projects evolve into books and exhibitions. A workshop for serious amateurs and professionals alike, it will taught by Alex and Rebecca, a creative team who often edit projects and books together –– including their joint book and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibition, “Violet Isle: A Duet of Photographs from Cuba,” Alex’s recent Aperture book, “The Suffering of Light,” and Rebecca’s new Radius book, “My Dakota.” Included in the workshop will be an editing exercise as well as an optional photography assignment and long-term project review.  For more information –– including how to enroll and daily schedule –– please contact Maja at the Robert Klein Gallery: maja@robertkleingallery.com

––FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5TH, 7PM, THRU SUNDAY, OCT. 7TH, 6PM: “Finding Your Vision@ The Dahl Weekend Workshop with Alex and Rebecca Webb,” Rapid City, South Dakota.  Do you know where you are going with your photography — or where it is taking you? This workshop will include a gallery talk/walk through of the current “My Dakota” exhibit at The Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City, and a digital assistant who can answer any your digital photography issues. Graduate and undergraduate college credit available for teachers and others who are interested. For all Colorado photographers interested in this workshop — or photographers who would like to fly into Denver — please note that Rapid City is only a six-hour drive from Denver, Colorado.  For more information click here.  If you have questions about the workshop, feel free to contact Rebecca directly at rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA:  AUGUST, SEPT., OCT.

NEW YORK

––THURSDAY, JUNE 21, thru August 17, 2012: RICCO MARESCA GALLERY, NY: “Weather,” a group exhibition with a selection of photographs from MY DAKOTA, 6-8 pm.  

SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA

––SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 11-11:45: “Here and There: The Photographs of Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb,” South Dakota Festival of Books, Orpheum Anne Zabel Theater, with “My Dakota” and “The Suffering of Light” book signing to follow at 1pm with other festival authors.

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA

–FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 7-8:30pm: “Together and Apart: The Photographs of Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb,” Dahl Arts Center, will include the “Our Dakota” slide show, Q&A with the Webbs, and book signing.

––JUNE-SEPTEMBER 2012: Launch of OUR DAKOTA Flickr site, an online photographic community  This Flickr group is open to all photographers 15 and older with a present or past connection to South Dakota.  Here is the link to the first assignment. There will be three assignments posted during the course of the “My Dakota” exhibition at the Dahl, and the group will culminate in an “Our Dakota” slide show to be show both at the SD Festival of Books in Sioux Falls the last week in September 2012 and at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City on Friday, Oct. 5th, at 7pm.

BOSTON

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 7-8:30 PM: Slide Talk with Alex and Rebecca in the Fort Point arts neighborhood of Boston, a talk which is free and open to the public

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 4-5PM: Gallery Talk/Walk Through with Rebecca of her “My Dakota” show with the Robert Klein Gallery at Ars Libri, followed by a Q&A with Rebecca and Alex, who edited “My Dakota” with Rebecca.

OTHER RECENT LINKS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA:

LINK TO THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG Q&A WITH REBECCA ABOUT “MY DAKOTA”

LINK TO ALEX’S EAST LONDON PHOTOGRAPHS IN THE AUGUST 2012 ISSUE OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC.

WEATHER SHOW AT RICCO MARESCA GALLERY IN NEW YORK CITY THRU FRIDAY, AUGUST 17TH.

Rebecca’s “My Dakota” work in Ricco Maresca Gallery’s “Weather” show in New York City.  The last day of the show is Friday, August 17th.

My Dakota on New York Times Lens Blog

June 21, 2012

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Rearview Mirror,” from the book, “My Dakota”

NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG: There aren’t that many South Dakotans, What characteristics contribute to South Dakota-ness?

REBECCA NORRIS WEBB: This month is the 40th anniversary of the Rapid City flood, the fifth worst flood in the nation’s history that claimed 238 lives.  Besides this rare flash flood, South Dakota blizzards, hail storms, and brutal winds are the stuff of legends. I’ve yet to meet a South Dakotan who hasn’t been humbled at least once by the weather.

NYTLB: You’re a New Yorker now. How are Dakotans different from New Yorkers?

RNW: Remember waking up during those New York City blizzards of January 2011, when all you’d hear was the muffled sound of snow falling?    Remember how the whole city seemed to be moving in slow motion? That sense of being dominated by the weather is a little like what it feels to be a South Dakotan.

LINK TO READ THE REST OF THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG Q&A WITH REBECCA ABOUT “MY DAKOTA”

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Blackbirds,” from My Dakota


UPCOMING EVENTS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA: JUNE, JULY, AUGUST

NEW YORK

––THURSDAY, JUNE 21, RICCO MARESCA GALLERY, NY: “Weather,” a group exhibition with a selection of photographs from MY DAKOTA, 6-8 pm.  The exhibition runs through August 17.

RAPID CITY, SD

––JUNE-SEPTEMBER 2012: Launch of OUR DAKOTA Flickr site, an online photographic community  This Flickr group is open to all photographers 15 and older with a present or past connection to South Dakota.  Here is the link to the first assignment. There will be three assignments posted during the course of the “My Dakota” exhibition at the Dahl, and the group will culminate in an “Our Dakota” slide show to be show both at the SD Festival of Books in Sioux Falls the last week in September 2012 and at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City on Friday, Oct. 5th, at 7pm.

––TUESDAY, AUGUST 7TH: “Slide Talk with Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb” at the “My Dakota” exhibition at the Dahl.  11:30-12:30pm.  Brown bag lunch event in the Ruth Brennan Gallery.  Free and open to the public. Rapid City Journal article about “My Dakota” written by Deanna Darr in the “Black Hills 2 Go” weekend section.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

June 1-30, 2012. “The Suffering of Light: 30 Years of Photographs,” at the Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA

SNOWMASS, COLORADO:

TUESDAY, JULY 7-8pm:“Together and Apart: The Photographs of Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb,” Schermer Hall, Anderson Ranch Campus, Snowmass, Colorado.  Q&A with the Webbs and book signing of “The Suffering of Light” and “My Dakota” to follow.

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA

>Friday evening, Oct. 5, thru Sunday, Oct. 7 pm: FINDING YOUR VISION WORKSHOP @ THE DAHL, Rapid City, South Dakota. Discount for members of the Dahl Arts Center.

Sunday, Oct. 21st through Sat., Oct. 27th, 2012: PROJECT WORKSHOP 2012 @ CAPTION GALLERY, DUMBO, BROOKLYN.  A small intimate workshop where participants spend a week editing and sequencing a long-term project, working on the text for it, and working with a designer on a cover. There will also be presentations about bookmaking including one by a photo book editor or publisher.  Former students are invited to apply, but other photographers will be considered as well.  This small workshop is almost full, so please contact Rebecca as soon as possible if you are interested: rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.

ADDITIONAL LINKS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA:

Alex’s interview with Geoff Dyer at the LOOK3 Photography Festival featured on The New York Times Magazine’s blog, THE SIXTH FLOOR.

–Link to “My Dakota,” which was recently featured on the New Yorker Photo Booth blog.

–Link to “Weather” mentioned on Elizabeth Avedon’s blog.

–Link to “My Dakota” at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City, June 1-Oct. 13, 2012.

–Link to “My Dakota” on Aperture’s Exposures blog.

“My Dakota” on Time Magazine’s Light Box

Alex’s recent work on Treece, a toxic U.S. town, in The New York Times Magazine.
Alex’s interview with Alessia Glaviano for Italian Vogue

See Alex and Rebecca’s photos and others from Magnum’s House of Pictures project in Rochester here

See Rebecca’s My Dakota in progress at Radius Books

Q&A with Rebecca and Sarah Rhodes on Timemachine

To read the Robert Klein Gallery Tripod Blog Q&A with Rebecca.

Read more about Magnum’s House of Pictures project in the New Yorker and see Alex’s photo of the day, April 24th.

Alex’s “The Suffering of Light” exhibition at Forma, Milan, featured in Italian Vogue.

WEATHER group show at Ricco/Maresca Gallery, June 21-Aug. 17, 2012

WEATHER @ Ricco Maresca Gallery, June 21-Aug. 17

June 18, 2012

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Storm Light,” from the new book, “My Dakota,” featured in this summer’s “Weather” show at Ricco/Maresca Gallery in NYC

In this land of flash floods and blizzards, hail storms and brutal winds, it’s rare to meet a South Dakotan who hasn’t been humbled by the weather.   

For me, it happened when I was driving home for the holidays from college with my younger sister, Mary.  We had just filled up her old Toyoto with gas in Wall, South Dakota, and were again heading West on I-90 after six hours of  painstakingly slow driving on snow-packed, slippery roads. We were both relieved to be on the “home stretch” to our parents’ place in the Black Hills because the radio’s winter weather warnings were urging all cars off the roads –- including the interstate, because, if the blizzard weren’t enough, there were also treacherous subzero windchill temperatures to contend with.  Was it 20 below? Thirty below?  I think it was starting to snow again, or perhaps it never really stopped…

All I remember for sure is that we were one of the last cars left on the road that Christmas Eve, that the sun was setting, and, that, all of a sudden Mary’s old car rolled to a halt.  We looked at each other –- pre-med student to poetry student –– in the rapidly dimming light, both of us too afraid to say what was really on our minds –- if we didn’t make the right decisions now, enough exposure to such bone-chilling temperatures could lead to the loss of fingers or toes, and lengthy exposure could be lethal.  Did I mention this was before cell phones?  I was the older, but Mary was the physically stronger of the two of us.  Who would stay and who would venture out for gas?  And exactly how far away was the gas station?  It seemed only a few minutes ago we’d filled up — and Mary, more the scientist than I –– was probably the first one to suspect that water in the gas from Wall was to blame for the car’s freezing up.  Could it be, however, that we’d actually been driving more like 10 or 15 minutes since the Wall gas stop ––  and , if so, just how many miles would that turn out to be?  

I remember staring long and hard into my sister’s dark brown, thoughtful eyes.  Before either of us could speak, one of those usually annoying, road-hogging semi-trailer trucks pulled up behind us and offered us a ride to the nearest gas station. I was never so thankful to be squooshed into such tight quarters with my sister in that wonderfully stuffy, musty cab that smelled of diesel and tobacco…I remember feeling oddly giddy as I clutched my AAA card in my right hand, which just wouldn’t stop shaking.–Rebecca Norris Webb

–“My Dakota” Q&A with Rebecca and Jim Estrin on the New York Times Lens Blog.

–Link to “My Dakota,” which was recently featured on the New Yorker Photo Booth blog.

–Link to “Weather” mentioned on Elizabeth Avedon’s blog.

–Link to “My Dakota” at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City, June 1-Oct. 13, 2012.

–Link to “My Dakota” on Aperture’s Exposures blog.

“My Dakota” on Time Magazine’s Light Box

©Rebecca Norris Webb, “Homestead Blizzard,” from the book, “My Dakota,” is part of the Weather” show at Ricco/Maresca Gallery, NYC

UPCOMING EVENTS: JUNE, JULY & AUGUST

NEW YORK

––THURSDAY, JUNE 21, RICCO MARESCA GALLERY, NY: “Weather,” a group exhibition with a selection of photographs from MY DAKOTA, 6-8 pm.  The exhibition runs through August 17.

RAPID CITY, SD

––JUNE-SEPTEMBER 2012: Launch of OUR DAKOTA Flickr site, an online photographic community  This Flickr group is open to all photographers 15 and older with a present or past connection to South Dakota.  Here is the link to the first assignment. There will be three assignments posted during the course of the “My Dakota” exhibition at the Dahl, and the group will culminate in an “Our Dakota” slide show to be show both at the SD Festival of Books in Sioux Falls the last week in September 2012 and at the Dahl Arts Center in Rapid City on Friday, Oct. 5th, at 7pm.

––TUESDAY, AUGUST 7TH: “Slide Talk with Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb” at the “My Dakota” exhibition at the Dahl.  11:30-12:30pm.  Brown bag lunch event in the Ruth Brennan Gallery.  Free and open to the public.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

June 1-30, 2012. “The Suffering of Light: 30 Years of Photographs,” at the Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA

SNOWMASS, COLORADO:

TUESDAY, JULY 7-8pm:“Together and Apart: The Photographs of Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb,” Schermer Hall, Anderson Ranch Campus, Snowmass, Colorado.  Q&A with the Webbs and book signing of “The Suffering of Light” and “My Dakota” to follow.

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA

>Friday evening, Oct. 5, thru Sunday, Oct. 7 pm: FINDING YOUR VISION WORKSHOP @ THE DAHL, Rapid City, South Dakota. Discount for members of the Dahl Arts Center.

Sunday, Oct. 21st through Sat., Oct. 27th, 2012: PROJECT WORKSHOP 2012 @ CAPTION GALLERY, DUMBO, BROOKLYN.  A small intimate workshop where participants spend a week editing and sequencing a long-term project, working on the text for it, and working with a designer on a cover. There will also be presentations about bookmaking including one by a photo book editor or publisher.  Former students are invited to apply, but other photographers will be considered as well.  This small workshop is almost full, so please contact Rebecca as soon as possible if you are interested: rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.

ADDITIONAL LINKS FOR ALEX AND REBECCA:

Alex’s interview with Geoff Dyer at the LOOK3 Photography Festival featured on The New York Times Magazine’s blog, THE SIXTH FLOOR.
Alex’s recent work on Treece, a toxic U.S. town, in The New York Times Magazine.
Alex’s interview with Alessia Glaviano for Italian Vogue

See Alex and Rebecca’s photos and others from Magnum’s House of Pictures project in Rochester here

See Rebecca’s My Dakota in progress at Radius Books

Q&A with Rebecca and Sarah Rhodes on Timemachine

To read the Robert Klein Gallery Tripod Blog Q&A with Rebecca.

Read more about Magnum’s House of Pictures project in the New Yorker and see Alex’s photo of the day, April 24th.

Alex’s “The Suffering of Light” exhibition at Forma, Milan, featured in Italian Vogue.

WEATHER group show at Ricco/Maresca Gallery, June 21-Aug. 17, 2012

POSTINGS: October 2010

October 18, 2010

This month, we are featuring TWO NEW PUBLICATIONS (including David Alan Harvey’s BURN, which is in print for the very first time), TWO OPENINGS in New York, TWO EVENTS at a brand new photography festival, called INVISION, TWO VIEWS of photographer  JULIE BLACKMON, and a FAREWELL to Canadian writer and photographer, JULIE MASON. –Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

BURN in Print

TWO NEW PUBLICATIONS: BURN and NOMADS

For everyone who has been following Magnum photographer DAVID ALAN HARVEY‘s award-winning online magazine, BURN, there’s now a print edition in the form of a 300-page book showcasing 25 photographers’ work, including ROGER BALLEN, JAMES NACHTWEY, as well many talented emerging photographers.  (Alex and I were honored to be asked to contribute a selection of photographs from VIOLET ISLE, our joint book on Cuba.) You can see a selection of the work — and read James Estrin’s piece — on the New York Times Lens Blog.  To see page samples from the new book, as well as order your own copy of BURNo1 — an edition of only 1,000 copies — visit the BURN web site.

There’s also a new online travel photography magazine with a twist:  the photographers — including ERNESTO BAZAN and ED KASHI — also supply the writing, in the form of journals, poetry, or other text pieces that accompany their images.  Called NOMADS, this beautifully designed, thoughtful, and often visually surprising online magazine is the brainchild of the insightful photographer/educator LAURI LYONS and her talented staff.  –Rebecca Norris Webb

NOMADS online magazine, cover of the first issue

TWO OPENINGS: NEW YORK CITY

Slota/LaBute collaboration, Ricco Maresca Gallery, NY

 

We wanted to note the opening of two exhibitions this week, both on THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21.

At RICCO MARESCA GALLERY, photographer GERALD SLOTA collaborates with the playwright, screenwriter, and film director, NEIL LABUTE.  Apparently the two of them met via email and decided to collaborate, creating a series of strange greeting cards, wherein LaBute would attempt to probe Slota’s psyche, and Slota would respond to Labute’s words in the form of images.  Slota’s photographs often push the edge of photographic technique, often distressing the image, by scratching on it or adding to it.  His work can be darkly psychological — as can the work of LaBute, who’s been called “America’s misanthrope par excellence” by the UK’s Independent. You can read more about the Slota/LaBute collaboration in the current issue of Fluence.

At 601 ARTSPACE, ROBERT BLAKE, formerly director of the General Studies Program at ICP, has curated a show of the work of JOE RODRIGUEZ and MARTIN WEBER, entitled “Cultural Memory Matters.” Both these photographers in very different ways have explored some of the issues surrounding cultural identity and heritage.  While Rodriguez, born in Brooklyn of Puerto Rican descent, approaches the world in a traditional documentary manner, photographing life as played out in front of the camera, Weber, from Argentina, often uses text pieces in the images, transforming or qualifying the viewer’s understanding of the photograph.  It should be interesting to see their work side by side.–Alex Webb


Rodriguez/Weber in "Cultural Memory Matters" at 601 ArtSpace

TWO MORE:  THE SHORT LIST

ALIA MALLEY has work in the SHFT New York pop-up gallery show, 112 Greene St., between Prince and Spring Streets, which opens on Thursday, October 21st, from 6-8pm.

RAJIV KAPOOR has an exhibit, “Paradoxes of Living on Holy Land,” at Seattle University’s Vachon & Kinsey Galleries, which is up through December 3.

TWO EVENTS:  New Photography Festival in Pennsylvania

Alex Webb, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1988, from "The Sunshine State"

We hope some of you can join us at a new photography festival, called INVISION, the first weekend in NOVEMBER, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, a short drive/bus ride from NEW YORK.  On Saturday evening, November 6, I will show a selection of work — featuring some of Rebecca’s photographs, too — as part of a weekend of photography with presentations by LARRY FINK, NICK NICHOLS, and PETER VAN AGTMAEL.

On Sunday, NOVEMBER 7, Rebecca and I, joined by others from the photography world, will conduct a series of portfolio reviews. (We understand there are only 30 slots available.)–Alex Webb

Rebecca Norris Webb, "After the Fire," Hermosa, SD, 2010, from "My Dakota"

 


TWO VIEWS:  Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon, from "Line-Up" exhibition at Robert Mann Gallery, NY

 

If you’re in New York, this is the last week to visit the JULIE BLACKMON show, LINE-UP, at the ROBERT MANN GALLERY, which is up through Saturday, October 23d.   Julie, like me, is the member of a large family — although, unlike me, she is the eldest of nine children, and I’m in the middle of five — and, when looking at her photographs in this exhibition, one can’t help but be transported back to one’s own childhood, with its terrors and its chaos and its comic antics.  Julie’s genius is that this childhood is seen through the prism of the Dutch Renaissance painters, especially Jan Steen’s domestic scenes,  and her beautiful prints are a mix of the staged, the improvised, and the photo-shopped — you can’t get more 21st Century than that!  Her marvelous first book, Domestic Vacations, is a welcome addition to any photographic library.–Rebecca Norris Webb

Julie Blackmon, from "Line-Up" at the Robert Mann Gallery, NY

A FAREWELL:  Julie Mason

Julie Mason by Julie Oliver, Ottawa Citizen

Alex and I like to think of our photographic workshops as communities, and it is with a heavy heart that I say goodbye to one of our treasured members, JULIE MASON, who died last weekend of ovarian cancer.  To honor Julie’s long commitment to social justice, health, and women’s issues, here is a video tribute to her from the Canadian House of Commons.

Alex and I had the pleasure of working with her on a long-term photographic project at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, as well as with her photographs during the Magnum Workshop in Toronto last May.  Julie, a gifted Canadian writer who was finding her way in her other passion, photography, gave as much — if not more — to Alex and myself, as we probably gave to her.  I was struck by her insights and her compassion and her generosity.  I remember last May after struggling through a presentation of “My Dakota,” an elegy for my brother, Dave, Julie took me aside and quietly mentioned her cancer.  She had not fear in her voice but love.  She was only telling me because she was concerned that her granddaughers, who meant the world to her, wouldn’t remember her.  I told her how important photographs were to my late brother’s two daughers and son.  So, together, we came up with the idea of  a “memory box,” with a mix of her photographs, writings, and momentos of times with her granddaughters to give to each of them.  Whether Julie had the time to create these objects is immaterial.  The memories of Julie, themselves, are the best memory box for any grandchild.

For those who knew Julie, and would like to leave a memory, Alex and I invite you to leave a comment in celebration of her life.  I guess, in a way, this POSTINGS column, is a kind of memory box for Julie.  For spending time in Julie’s presence was a gift to each of us who had the good fortune to have known her — no matter for how long.–Rebecca Norris Webb


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