Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn’

UNBOUND at VERGE ART BROOKLYN

February 14, 2011

Dimitri Mellos, cover of "Its Strangest Patterns"

It’s common to celebrate the birth of a photographer’s new photo book at a gallery exhibition.  Instead, the UNBOUND exhibition at the CAPTION GALLERY — during the inaugural VERGE ART BROOKLYN festival the first week in March this year — celebrates the long and often arduous labor — with its joys and pangs and meanderings — that accompanies the process of making a photo book.  For those who’d like a window into this at times difficult, at times mysterious bookmaking process, please stop by and visit UNBOUND, a show that features the fruits of  the labor of last fall’s intense, intimate, and now annual PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP.  The opening reception for UNBOUND will be Thursday, March 3d, from 9-10:30 pm during the first night of the Verge Art Brooklyn, a festival that coincides with the annual Armory Show this year.  The UNBOUND exhibition will run until the end of May 2011.

At the time of this writing, the UNBOUND photographers include DIMITRI MELLOS, NICOLE LECORGNE, FRANK HACK, S.M. MAES, GUILLERMO DE YAVORSKY, SHAUN ROBERTS, CHRIS CHADBOURNE, and JASON TANNER.  We so appreciate their willingness to exhibit a work-in-progress (one framed print and one designed cover or book spread), that we decided to join them, with work from our two upcoming books: Alex’s The Suffering of Light: 30 Years of Photographs (Aperture/T&H UK/Edition, May 2011) and Rebecca’s My Dakota (Radius Books, 2012). There will be more details about the opening on the blog on Monday, February 28th, the week of the VERGE ART BROOKLYN festival.—Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

For more about the next Photo Project Workshop at the Caption Gallery the last week in October, 2011, please visit Alex and Rebecca’s website.  To learn more about their upcoming editing workshop at LOOK3 photography festival in June, please visit LOOK3. For those interested in a photographing workshop, there are two places left in the Barcelona: Finding Your Vision workshop the last week in March. Lastly, here’s the link to the London Telegraph online’s Q&A with Alex and Rebecca.

Nicole LeCorgne, cover of "Divinity Street: The Moulids of Cairo"

 

TWO VIEWS: “The Snow Man”

January 27, 2011

Alex Webb, Brooklyn, 2011

In celebration of last night’s snow storm — and the snowiest January in NYC history — we’re posting some of Alex’s photographs taken early the morning after in our Park Slope neighborhood, accompanied by Rebecca’s reading of Wallace Stevens’ “The Snow Man,” filmed by Alex.

We’re dedicating the column today to Deborah Baril, Rebecca’s sister, in celebration of another event — her birthday.–– Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

The Snow Man

WALLACE STEVENS

One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;

And have been cold a long time
To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
The spruces rough in the distant glitter

Of the January sun; and not to think
Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
In the sound of a few leaves,

Which is the sound of the land
Full of the same wind
That is blowing in the same bare place

For the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

Alex Webb, Brooklyn, January, 2011

Alex Webb, Brooklyn, January, 2011

Alex Webb, Brooklyn, January, 2011

Alex Webb, Brooklyn, January, 2011

UNBOUND: Maes and Roberts

November 29, 2010

This week we are featuring the work of S.M. MAES and SHAUN ROBERTS, two participants in the THE PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP that we conducted this past October.  In this workshop, we work with the participants to help them shape a project into a more coherent form, ultimately into a handmade book dummy.  This process involves working with participants to edit and sequence their work, and pushing them to try to come to grips with the core or heart of their project.   In addition, Rebecca, who is a writer and text editor as well as photographer,  helps the participants write an artist statement and find a title.  Lastly, we introduce workshop participants to the process of working with a designer.  Each photographer meets with a designer early in the week, who then creates two covers for their work-in-progress by the end of the workshop.

Here are two of these cover selections –– along with their accompanying artist statements and titles ––one from Belgian street photographer, S.M. Maes, and the other, from the San Francisco-based photographer and director, Shaun Roberts.  Over the course of the next six months or so, we will publish the other covers produced in the workshop. There will also be an exhibition in New York, hopefully next spring, of all the covers plus one framed print from each of the projects at the Caption Gallery in Brooklyn.

We expect to give the workshop on an annual basis in Brooklyn the last week in October.  To stay updated about this and other Webb Workshops, please request to be  added to the WEBB WORKSHOP EMAIL LIST.  You’ll find the details at the end of this blog posting.––Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

AMBIGUOUS CITY: Photographs from Antwerp

By S.M. Maes

S.M. Maes, cover-in-progress for "Ambiguous City"

“[Antwerp is] ambiguous—a vibrant blossoming culture on top, and a rusty brown sentiment beneath the cobblestones…Like every city, there is a visible one, and one where only its inhabitants can lead you.”––Ramsey Nasr, city poet of Antwerp

“..the people who move through the streets are all strangers. At each encounter, they imagine a thousand things about one another; meetings, which could take place between them, conversations, surprises, caresses, bites. But no one greets anyone; eyes lock for a second, then dart away, seeking other eyes, never stopping…something runs among them, an exchange of glances like lines that connect one figure with another and draw arrows, stars, triangles, until all combinations are used up in a moment, and other characters come on to the scene… ” ––Italo Calvino, from “Invisible Cities

 

The act of taking a picture to me is an attempt at transforming the city around me into the city I ‘feel,’ as it were. This city is out there, imagined by me somehow, and reveals itself in glimpses. It’s a city that is characterized by a strange and an alluring complexity –– a city in which different people, situations, actions, moods, and emotions intersect. Because of this complexity, there is no singular story to be told, but two or three or multiple stories, all existing simultaneously. Hence there is no need to search for a single ending or resolution or meaning. One would only get lost. ––S.M. Maes

S.M. MAES WEBSITE

AUDEN’S WORDS

Photographs by Shaun Roberts

Shaun Roberts, cover-in-progess for "Auden's Words"

 

“Healing,” Papa would tell me, “ is not a science, but the intuitive art

of wooing nature.” – W.H. Auden


This project grew from a need to make sense of the world around me after having suffered a personal loss in my life. A close friend and poet offered the above W.H. Auden quote to consider. I found comfort in these words that quietly stuck with me, even if I didn’t fully grasp their meaning.

Again in again, in Shanghai, Bangkok, San Francisco, New York, where ever I traveled for the next few years, I found myself drawn to the undeniable grace of strangers. Some passed me in a fraction of a second, barely enough for an exposure — while others eventually I had the privilege of getting to know.

The images they offered me  – gathered together in this book – mysteriously but consistently wooed me away from the pain and the isolation. They showed me how to fall in love with the world –– person by person, moment by moment, frame by frame –– all over again.––Shaun Roberts

SHAUN ROBERTS WEBSITE


To stay updated about the next PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP, which is not posted yet, please request to be added to the WEBB WORKSHOP EMAIL LIST by emailing Rebecca at rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.

TWO LOOKS: Laara Matsen and Jonas Bendiksen

January 20, 2010

Since Rebecca and I are traveling next week, we decided to post this month’s TWO LOOKS column a few days early.  For January, we’re featuring the work of LAARA MATSEN, a U.S. photographer who also works as a curator and photo editor, and JONAS BENDIKSEN, Magnum’s sole Norwegian photographer. These married photographers have been together for about as long as we have, and, like Rebecca and myself, have worked on photographic books and exhibitions together, including Jonas’s two books, Satellites, his seven-year journey through the isolated communities on the fringes of the former Soviet Union, and his most recent book, The Places We Live, in which he documents the fragile dwellings of the poor in four of the most overcrowded cities in the world. Former New Yorkers, Laara and Jonas now live near Oslo with their son Milo, which is unfortunate for all of us who miss the couple’s warmth, insights, and humor, but lucky for the Norwegian photographic community.––Alex Webb

LAARA ON JONAS’S PHOTOGRAPH

Jonas Bendiksen, Birobidzhan bus stop, 1999

When Jonas and I met in January 1998, he was preparing to move to the Russian Far East for a year to begin his first long-term photographic project. By August he was there, and on New Year’s Eve, 1999, I landed in Siberia for what was, in all practical senses, our fourth date. The story he was chasing there was subtle: the disappearance of a forgotten community. There wasn’t actually much happening in Birobidzhan, but each morning he would slip out of bed and go out into the deeply sub-frozen predawn to shoot, returning with numb hands a few hours later. I always stayed warm under the covers. He shot mostly slides, and there was no reliable photo lab in the small town, so the results of his labor remained unseen until I brought seven months worth of film back to New York for processing.

I spent many hours over the next three months holding his slides up to the window of my tiny Brooklyn apartment waiting to see him again. This image was one of my favorites then, and remains so after 11 years. Three people waiting for the bus in the cold. Simple. But also ambiguous, humorous, cinematically lovely, and an astute translation of the complex and elusive Russianness that I knew he had been hunting over there. More personally, it stood as concrete proof of the parts of Jonas that most fascinated me (and still do): his solid patience, keen awareness of nuance, and good Norwegian ability to tolerate ungodly cold.–– Laara Matsen

Laara is in the process of building a website.

JONAS ON LAARA’S PHOTOGRAPH

Laara Matsen, "Ghost Man," Brooklyn, 1999

When Laara and I first got together, I moved into her tiny studio apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. We used to sit out on the window ledge in the evenings, airing the tiny space out and watching people go by. It was my first real meeting with New York, and I remember that summer as a magical time. New York seemed so full of promise. I was fresh in photography, and New York was like a big cake made of things that could happen, and we were eating it.

Laara had taken this picture from the windows of our place. Just the fact that it was taken from that one spot makes it special to me. It was our first view, from our first window. But it’s the guy in the street, bleached dazzling white by the headlights of two trucks, that always grabs me. He always made me think of a blank slate. Like someone who had shed their skin, and was looking for a new one –  looking for who he was or maybe who he should be. Looking back at that time, I think that’s how I felt, sitting on that window ledge, wondering what the future would hold.

Also, I think what I love about the picture is that it’s this otherworldly moment taken without actually leaving our house. Just a fleeting moment, that probably nobody else in the world saw except her. A good reminder that if one is open enough, magic can appear at any moment in the day, wherever you look.––Jonas Bendiksen

Jonas’s photographs on the Magnum website.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 276 other followers