Archive for the ‘Violet Isle’ Category

THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT: New Yorker, NYT Lens Blog

December 12, 2011

Alex Webb, "Thessaloniki, Greece, 2003," from "The Suffering of Light" in the "New Yorker," December 19, 2011

Congratulations to Alex and Aperture for the coverage of the current THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT exhibition in this week’s NEW YORKER, WALL STREET JOURNAL, as well as on THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG, SLATE, the NO RING CIRCUS blog, and an interview with NATALIA JIMENEZ on the MSNBC BLOG.  In addition, THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT  is also included as one of PDN NOTABLE BOOKS OF 2011, one of AMERICAN PHOTO’s BEST PHOTO BOOKS OF 2011, one of the GUARDIAN’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKS OF THE YEAR, 2011, one of PHOTO EYE’s Best Photography Books of 2011, and one of ELISABETH BIONDI’S choices for 2011 BEST PHOTOGRAPHY BOOKS on ELIZABETH AVEDON’S blog.

For those who didn’t get a chance to see the exhibition yet, consider attending Alex’s gallery talk at APERTURE on Saturday, December 17th, from 4-5 pm.–Rebecca Norris Webb

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS:

Alex Webb, “The Suffering of Light,” @ Aperture, New York, through January 19, 2012

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb, “Violet Isle: A Photographic Portrait of Cuba,” @ MFA, Boston, through Jan. 16, 2012

Alex Webb, “The Suffering of Light,” at the Stephen Bulger Gallery, Toronto, through Jan. 14, 2012

Rebecca Norris Webb and other artists, “Winged Shadows: Life Among Birds,” NDMOA, Grand Forks, ND, through Jan. 15, 2012

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

January 22-29, 2012: “The Streets of Havana,” a Nordic Light Workshop, is almost full.

Additional Webb Workshops 2012 include:

Sunday May 20 to Friday May 25, 2012,  Brooklyn, New York, “Finding Your Vision Workshop”

Friday, March 9 thru Sunday, March 11, 2012, Singapore, “Finding Your Vision” weekend workshop

Friday March 23 to Sunday March 25, 2012, possible weekend workshop @ Aperture, NY

For more information, please contact Rebecca:  rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.   Ask to placed on the email blog/workshop update list for the latest workshop information.

Rebecca Norris Webb, "Havana, 2007" at MFA, Boston & NDMOA

DECEMBER EVENTS: Alex @ Aperture

November 28, 2011

Alex Webb, cover of his Aperture monograph, "The Suffering of Light"

UPCOMING EVENTS

––Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011, New York, Aperture Gallery; 6-8 pm

All are invited to the opening reception of Alex Webb’s 50-print exhibition of his recent Aperture monograph of 30 years of color photographs, “The Suffering of Light.”  For more information.

 ––Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011, New York, Aperture Gallery and Book Store, 4-6 pm

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb will sign copies of their books,  including “The Suffering of Light” (AW, Aperture, 2011), “Violet Isle (AW, RNW, Radius), Istanbul (AW, Aperture),  and their two out-of-print books, “Under a Grudging Sun “ (AW, Thames and Hudson, 1989) and “The Glass Between Us” (Channel, 2006). Link.

 ––Saturday, Dec. 17th, 2011, New York, Aperture Gallery, 4-5 pm

Alex Webb will give a free public gallery talk about his current exhibition at the Aperture Gallery. Link.

RELATED LINKS/REVIEWS:

–Selection of photographs from the Aperture book,  “The Suffering of Light,” on Slate.

Review of Alex's book in L'Express

  ONGOING EVENTS:

––VIOLET ISLE @ the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, through Monday, January 16, 2012

A Photographic Portrait of Cuba by Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb.

This exhibition explores photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb’s poetic vision of Cuba, the Caribbean island that—because of the color of its soil—is occasionally known as the “Violet Isle.” The couple became fascinated with the paradoxes of the place some twenty years ago, and made eleven trips to photograph there between 1993 and 2008. They worked individually—Alex capturing the people he encountered on the streets, in courtyards and cafes, and Rebecca recording the interesting animals that she came across—and pooled the results of their labors at the end of the endeavor. Combined, the photographers’ efforts form a rich visual essay, a sort of duet on the lyrical vibrancy and texture of the island’s culture.

Link to the BOSTON GLOBE review of the exhibition.

––Tues., November 29th, 2011 to Jan. 15, 2012, Grand Forks, North Dakota

“Winged Shadows: Life Among Birds,” group show featuring work by Rebecca Norris Webb, Terry Evans, Walton Ford, and other artists.  For more information, please visit the museum’s website here.

It was evening all afternoon.

It was snowing

And it was going to snow.

The blackbird sat

In the cedar-limbs.

–from “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird” by Wallace Stevens

Rebecca Norris Webb, Sancti Spiritus, Cuba, in the NDMOA show, "Winged Shadows"

 ––Dec. 1, 2011 to January 14, 2012, Toronto, Stephen Bulger Gallery; 5-9 pm

Please join us for the reception of Alex Webb’s gallery show at the Stephen Bulger Gallery, which will feature a selection of work from his recent book.  For more information.

 

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS:

December 17, 2011: ONE-DAY WORKSHOP @ APERTURE

New York, Aperture Gallery , 10-5pm

Do you know where you’re going next with your photography –– or where it’s taking you?  This intensive one-day workshop will help photographers begin to understand their own distinct way of seeing the world.  It will also help photographers figure out their next step photographically  –– from deepening their own unique vision to the process of discovering and making a long-term project that they’re passionate about.  For more information, including how to enroll and pay for the workshop, please visit.

THIS WORKSHOP IS NOW FULL. TO BE PLACED ON A WAITING LIST, PLEASE EMAIL REBECCA: rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com

––THE STREETS OF HAVANA: A Nordic Light Workshop

Sunday, January 22, to Saturday, January 29, 2012; possible second week:  Jan. 29 to Feb. 4, 2012

This 7-day workshop will be about street photography in Havana –– using the camera to explore the world of this one-of-a-kind Caribbean city in a direct, spontaneous way.  It is a workshop that will emphasize the development of a unique, personal way of seeing and the development of an intuitive way of editing your photographs. We will also discuss with participants over the week how to take their work to the next level. It’s a workshop open to amateurs and professionals alike.  For more information.

Rebecca Norris Webb, from "Communion" series, from her talk at the Brooklyn Public Library as part of the "Jump Rope Girls Project" in December

NOVEMBER EVENTS: Paris, Munich, Brooklyn

November 7, 2011

Alex Webb, Kampala, Uganda, 1980, from "The Suffering of Light"

––BOOK SIGNING AT PARIS PHOTO @ THE GRAND PALAIS

SATURDAY, NOV. 12, 4:30 @ APERTURE BOOTH, E26

Join us for a book signing of Alex’s new book, THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT (exhibition opening @ Aperture in New York, Thursday, Dec. 8th), and our joint Cuba book, VIOLET ISLE  (exhibition currently at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, until January 16th, 2012; Radius Books expects VIOLET ISLE to be sold out by the end of the year).  We will post other book signings and activities we’ll be involved in @ Paris Photo –– which this year celebrates African photography –– as we finalize our schedule.  Here is a link to more Aperture book signings at Paris Photo this year, including a signing by one of Rebecca’s favorite photographers, Rinko Kawauchi.Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

––ALEX WEBB LECTURE IN MUNICH

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18TH.   For more information (only in German), please follow this link.  Alex will be speaking as part of a conference.

––REBECCA NORRIS WEBB  @ THE BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY

Rebecca will join a group of filmmakers, writers, and other photographers involved in the Brooklyn project, “Jump Rope Girls,” a project started by journalist, SUSAN HARTMAN, for an article she did for The New York Times 23 years ago about a group of girls who were expert Double Dutch jumpers at a time when their Brooklyn neighborhood was particularly troubled.  A generation later, Hartman — with a group of documentary filmmakers and photographers — has continued to follow three of the four young women and their extended family and community, including Savannah (below), whom Rebecca has been photographing this past year, a process that’s taking her back to her photographic roots –– she started out in photography photographing children at play in New York, influenced by the street work of Helen Levitt and the portraits of Sally Mann.–Alex Webb

Information:

Jump Rope Girls, 23 Years On

Wed., November 30, 2011    7:00 pm    Free

Brooklyn Public Library     10 Grand Army Plaza   MAP IT

2/3 trains at Grand Army Plaza

Refreshments by Salsa Catering.

Rebecca Norris Webb, "Communion," Brooklyn, 2011

WEBB WORKSHOP UPDATE: TWO NEW WORKSHOPS

––ONE DAY WORKSHOP @ APERTURE, NY: Saturday, December 17, 2011
––CUBA: STREETS OF HAVANA, Nordic Light Workshop: JANUARY 2012

Alex Webb, Havana, 2009, from "Violet Isle"

––ONE-DAY WORKSHOP @ APERTURE, NYC

with Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Saturday, December 17, 10-5 pm; includes public gallery talk with Alex Webb about his Aperture exhibition, THE SUFFERING OF LIGHT from 4 to 5 pm.

$225; $175 for full time photography students and Aperture members

Do you know where you’re going next with your photography –– or where it’s taking you?  This intensive one-day workshop will help photographers begin to understand their own distinct way of seeing the world.  It will also help photographers figure out their next step photographically  –– from deepening their own unique vision to the process of discovering and making a long-term project that they’re passionate about.

A workshop for serious amateurs and professionals alike, this one-day workshop will begin Saturday  morning with reviews of each photographer’s work, serving as a jumping off point for a larger discussion about various photographic issues. Alex and Rebecca, a creative team who often edit projects and books together –– including their book and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibition, “Violet Isle: A Duet of Photographs from Cuba” –– will explore with the class a series of topics, including the process of photographing spontaneously and intuitively; how to photograph in cultures other than one’s own; how to edit photographs intuitively; the emotional and psychological implications of working in color vs. black and white; the difference between images in a book and images on the wall; and how long-term projects can evolve into books and exhibitions. Participants should be prepared to ask questions, as these concerns will help shape the ultimate direction of the workshop.

This one-day workshop is for documentary photographers, street photographers, art photographers, and others who photograph the world with a camera –– not for those who dramatically alter their photographs digitally.  

WHAT PHOTOGRAPHERS SHOULD BRING: About 30 photography prints (can be inexpensive 5×7  or 8×10  work prints; we are most interested in the image not the quality of the print).  For those who are working in a series or on a long-term project, feel free to bring one or two projects.

Class limit: 20

To enroll for the workshop and pay the workshop fee (there is a discounted rate for full-time photography students, Aperture Patrons, and SNAP! members), please follow this link to the Aperture site. For more information, contact Rebecca at rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.

––THE STREETS OF HAVANA with NORDIC LIGHT

Sunday, January 22, 2012 to Saturday, January 28, 2012; possible second week, Jan. 29-Feb. 5 

Havana workshop, organized by Norway’s Nordic Light Photography Festival.  For more information, follow this link.

Rebecca Norris Webb, Havana, 2008, from "Violet Isle"

OCTOBER EVENTS: DC, Oslo, and Brooklyn

October 5, 2011

Alex Webb, "Matamoros, Mexico, 1978," from the book, "Crossings"

Please let us know if you can join us this month in DC, OSLO, or DUMBO, Brooklyn, at one of our slide talks/book signings.  You’ll find the details of all the slide talks below.

For those interested, you’ll also find information about our October (Brooklyn), November (Munich), and December (Toronto) workshops at the end of this posting.––Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

UPCOMING WEBB SLIDE TALKS AND BOOK SIGNINGS:

  • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6TH, WASHINGTON, D.C., 6:30 PM
  • MONDAY, OCTOBER 10TH, OSLO, NORWAY, 5-8 PM
  • SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23D, DUMBO, BROOKLYN, 5 PM
A PHOTOGRAPHER’S JOURNEY
A CONVERSATION WITH ALEX WEBB
Join us for this captivating conversation between photographer Alex Webb and Juan García de Oteyza, curator of our current exhibition Mexico Through the Lens of National Geographic and former director of the Aperture Foundation in New York City.  Webb will present his most recent monograph, the Suffering of Light, which is largely drawn from his work in Latin America; provide insight into his fascinating photographs of the US/ Mexican border that are featured in the exhibition; and have a conversation with García de Oteyza about the important role of photographs and photographers in shaping our understanding of people and places.
Copies of The Suffering of Light and Violet Isle will be available for purchase by cash or check before and after the talk.
OCTOBER 6, 2011 | 6:30 PM
MEXICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE
2829 16th Street NW, Washington, DC, 20009
 
FREE ADMISSION
SEATING IS LIMITED
RSVP RECOMMENDED:
Rebecca Norris Webb, “The Sky Below,” from the upcoming book, “My Dakota”
AN EVENING OF PHOTOGRAPHY WITH ALEX WEBB, REBECCA NORRIS WEBB, AND JOSH LUSTIG
Host of the Evening Event: Norwegian Photographer Rune Eraker
Fritt Ord
Uranienborgveien 2, Oslo
Monday, October 10th,  from 17:00-20:00
Free and open to the public
This Oslo event will be hosted by Norwegian photographer Rune Eraker. Along with Alex and Rebecca Webb, Josh Lustig from Panos will also be speaking about the role of photo Agencies today as well as various ways to cultivate long term projects. There will be a debate and Q/A session after the talks.
For more information: Fritt Ord website
Rebecca Norris Webb and Alex Webb speak at PowerHouse in Brooklyn on Sunday, Oct. 23d, at 5pm
WORKSHOP UPDATE:
  1. There is one place left in our most advanced workshop, THE PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP 2011, the last week of October in Dumbo.  All former Webb Workshop photographers are invited to apply, but others will be considered as well.  For more information, follow this link of the Magnum Events page, or contact Rebecca directly at rebeccanorriswebb@yahoo.com.
  2. We’re holding a two-day photography workshop in Munich, November 15 and 16th.  Here is the link (only in German at this time).
  3. There are only three spots left in our upcoming workshop the first weekend of December at the Stephen Bulger Gallery in Toronto.  You can read more about the workshop here, or contact Natalie directly at the gallery: natalie@bulgergallery.com

TWO EVENTS: London

June 13, 2011

Alex Webb, cover of "The Suffering of Light," Thames&Hudson (UK)/Aperture (US), 2011


Hope to see some of you who can make our joint slide talk, “Together and Apart: Photographs by Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb,” at Host/Foto 8 on Tuesday, June 21st, which will also include a book signing of “The Suffering of Light,” Alex’s new book from Thames and Hudson/Aperture.  It starts at 7 pm, but the doors open at 6:30 pm.  Please leave us a comment if you can join us. 

And we hope our friends in London have a chance to see Alex’s show at  Magnum Print Room at Magnum London, which will be up until July 29th (you’ll find the exhibition hours at the link above.)  Magnum London has some signed books for those who are interested.

Lastly, we enjoyed meeting everyone at our weekend workshop in East London.  Please stay in touch.  In 2012, we plan to do a longer, six-day workshop in East London, probably the first week in July 2012. --Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

UPCOMING PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOPS WITH ALEX AND REBECCA:

––Book Weekend with Radius Books (and the Webbs):  Friday, Sept. 23, to Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011, Santa Fe, NM

–- The Photo Project Workshop: Sunday, Oct. 23, to Saturday, Oct. 29th, 2011, New York

All former Webb Workshop participants are invited to participate, but others will be considered as well.

Rebecca Norris Webb, "Violet Isle" cover, Radius Books

VIOLET ISLE at the MFA, BOSTON

May 23, 2011

Rebecca Norris Webb, "Havana, 2007" from the book, "Violet Isle"

What better way of celebrating our exhibition of Violet Isle at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, than with our work set to our favorite Cuban duet, “Silencio,” just launched as the latest Magnum in Motion?

We’d like give a special thanks to the Magnum In Motion team, especially to Phil Bicker and Adrian Kelterborn, who produced this presentation of Violet Isle.—Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Alex Webb, Cienfuegos, Cuba, 2007, from "Violet Isle"

TWO QUESTIONS: On Photographs that Inspire and Confound; On Birds and Returning

January 4, 2011

This month’s TWO QUESTIONS column features questions posed by two U.S. photographers. Based in Austin, Texas, BILL MCCULLOUGH makes his living predominantly from photographing weddings.  However, he is far from your typical wedding photographer — his pictures are witty, surprising, spontaneous; they take us into social worlds not often seen so perceptively.  His humor is gentle and good-natured, very much like Bill himself.  EMILY PEDERSON is currently studying photography, languages (she has mastered Portuguese, Spanish, and Czech), and social justice at New York University.   Her grandfather was a noted underwater photographer, so she grew up with photography in her life.   She has photographed in Latin America, Eastern Europe, and New York, as well as in her home state of Rhode Island.--Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Robert Frank, "Elevator Girl, Miami, 1955" from "The Americans"

BILL MCCULLOUGH: In photography, music, painting, and many other forms of expression, there is work that strikes the perfect balance of technique and emotion that can leave one in awe.  You may ask yourself, “how did they do that?” You are both photographers who have been in the trenches and attempted many things; therefore, you also have insight, understanding, and respect of what is truly difficult to accomplish.  Is there a photographer, dead or alive, who both inspires you and stumps you?  If so, who and why?

ALEX WEBB:  Ever since I first picked up a copy of Frank’s The Americans –– sometime in the late 1960’s –– my favorite photograph in the book has always been the mournful elevator girl.  I hesitate to say much of anything about it because Jack Kerouac in his introduction to the book said just about everything that needs to be said:  “And I say: That little ole elevator girl looking up sighing in an elevator full of blurred demons, what’s her name and address?”   What Kerouac latches onto is what has always most intrigued me about Frank’s work, its emotive heart.  Somehow, Frank managed to make deep and surprising poetry out of the mundane stuff of the world of America.

That quality is still what interests me most about Frank’s work. But looking back now at this photograph, I am also intrigued by how it speaks of another era in America.  I can’t recall when I last saw an elevator girl.  The notion seems quaint.  It makes me almost nostalgic, nostalgic, among other things, for a more intimate world, where human beings –– including those in more menial positions –– somehow seemed to count.  Now, soulless elevators in Miami gleam of burnished chrome.  Chimes denoting each floor have replaced the human voice.  Modern demons may sometimes stalk these elevators, but mournful elevator girls are long gone.   I guess today, Kerouac would have to go elsewhere to find a name and number.

Robert Frank, "Barber shop through screen door, McClellanville, SC, 1955," from "The Americans"

REBECCA NORRIS WEBB: From the moment I first saw a print of Robert Frank’s barbershop in McClellanville, South Carolina, the image has lingered with me, a sign –– I’ve learned to trust over the years –– of a truly poetic image.  Like the strongest and most resonant poems, the image sends me into a kind of reverie each time I view it.  I think this has something to do with the fact that it’s a reflection, one that blurs inside and outside, like a daydream. So, for me at least, Frank’s mysterious barbershop blurs into the barbershop in my small town in southern Indiana where I was born.  Like Frank, I, too, have pressed up against a small town barbershop’s screen door, have seen into the interior thanks to my own shadow.  Come to think of it, the screen door itself seems somehow quintessentially American (I don’t recall coming across that many screen doors in Europe, for instance…).  The screen door is welcoming yet protective, practical yet vulnerable, luring both june bugs and photographers alike.

ROBERT FRANK LINKS:

Link to NPR story:  “Robert Frank’s Elevator Girls Sees Herself Years Later”:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112389032

Link to Robert Frank’s book, “The Americans”:

http://www.amazon.com/Americans-Robert-Frank/dp/386521584X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1294157675&sr=8-1

Link to reviews of the “Looking In: Robert Franks” The Americans” show:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/09/14/090914fa_fact_lane

http://www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/2009/sep/29/looking-in-robert-franks-emthe-americansem/

Links to reviews of Robert Frank’s,  “The Americans”

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=100688154

http://www.harpers.org/archive/2010/01/0082794

Rebecca Norris Webb, Havana, 2008, from "Violet Isle"

EMILY PEDERSON: Rebecca, what is it about birds?  In Violet Isle, birds are constantly appearing in your photographs. Why is that? What is it that draws you to birds?

RNW:  As someone who comes out of the street photography tradition, I only photograph what I come across in the world, and the most common creature I found in Cuban menageries was the bird –– from roosters and peacocks and woodpeckers to cockatiels and pigeons and parrots.  I love the rich and resonant questions this suggests:  Of all the creatures, why are birds the most popular animal in Cuban menageries?  What does this suggest about the individuals who have these menageries?  What does this suggest about Cubans and their relationship to nature?  And what does this suggest about Cuban culture more generally?

What I love about photography –– and poetry –– is that sometimes images have the ability to suggest these sorts of questions.  One of my favorite lines about birds is by the poet, Li-Young Lee:

Only birds can reveal to us dying by flying.

And just yesterday I came across these two wonderful lines by T.S. Eliot in his poem, “Four Quartets”:

…a hollow rumble of wings…

…wait for the early owl…

Personally, when I first started photographing birds in Cuba, it was a period in my life that roughly corresponded to my acquiring my first pair of professional birding binoculars, inspired in part by the red-tailed hawks in Prospect Park near my apartment, the same kind of hawk that’s also found in my home state of South Dakota.

During one of my last trips to Havana, I remember the delight of watching a hawk attempting to open her wings just inches away from me –– instead of my observing the raptor from the usual distance of my field glasses.  Yet simultaneously I also felt a something catch in my throat as I watched the hawk fumble, unable to spread her wings fully in so small a cage .  Looking back, I realize that I often had this complicated and seemingly contradictory emotional response –– delight and discomfort –– while photographing caged birds throughout Cuba.

Li-Young Lee link:  http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/291

LInk to T.S. Eliot’s poem, “Four Quartets”:  http://www.tristan.icom43.net/quartets/

Alex Webb, Havana, 2008, from "Violet Isle"

 

EP: Alex, when you photograph you seem to go back again and again to a particular place. You don’t move there for a while to carry out your work, but you return over and over. How does that affect the way you see, the way you work?

AW: My meanderings in a country are rarely planned.  For instance, in Havana, even when I find myself working in the same neighborhood, it is often somewhat by chance: I wander into the same locale three days later –– or even, perhaps, a year later.  And even if I contemplate returning to a specific area, it is often a spur of the moment decision: I find myself completing work in one street or block and suddenly decide to return to somewhere that I have been before.  Sure, sometimes I may decide that a street or a market that I photographed in the morning might be more interesting in the afternoon or vice-versa, but as often as not the return to a particular locale is serendipitous.

For instance, the above photograph was taken during my last of 11 trips to Havana over 15 years.  Who know how many times I had walked down this particular street during my other trips.  But the particular mood and color and feel of the street caught my eye in fall 2009.

EMILY PEDERSON

Emily Pederson, Prague, 2009

I was born in Newport, Rhode Island in 1989. I study photography, Portuguese, and Spanish at the Gallatin School at New York University.

My grandfather was an undersea photographer and cinematographer, and documented undersea life in the Bahamas in the 50s and 60s. So there were always neat old cameras in my house as I was growing up, and I started to take photographs early on. The summer after my junior year in high school I lived in Peru for a month doing volunteer work at an orphanage. It was my first true experience of life elsewhere, and it played out like a fever dream. I took thirty rolls of film, and after that was significantly more fascinated by photography.

After graduating high school, I moved to New York City and have lived there since, except for four months last year, which I spent studying in Prague, learning Czech and traveling in Eastern Europe. I’m currently working with Alex Harsley at the 4th Street Photo Gallery, which he established in 1971, helping him distribute his work and documenting the history the gallery has witnessed. I see photographs as agents of information and as records of light. What allures me the most is how photography gives us the ability to freeze time.–Emily Pederson

My website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/emilykpederson/

BILL MCCULLOUGH

Bill McCullough, Waco, Texas, 2005

American photographer Bill McCullough was born in 1963, in Dickenson Texas. He graduated with a degree in Plan II economics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1986. He is a self taught photographer. His work has been published in Spot (Houston Center of Photography), United States; and Photonews, Germany. In 2008,  his work was purchased for the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. His first solo show will take place at the SRO gallery at Texas Tech University in March, 2011. He has been chosen as a 2010 Fotofest discovery. He currently resides and works in Austin, Texas.

Bill’s webswite:  www.billmccullough.com

POSTINGS: October 2010

October 18, 2010

This month, we are featuring TWO NEW PUBLICATIONS (including David Alan Harvey’s BURN, which is in print for the very first time), TWO OPENINGS in New York, TWO EVENTS at a brand new photography festival, called INVISION, TWO VIEWS of photographer  JULIE BLACKMON, and a FAREWELL to Canadian writer and photographer, JULIE MASON. –Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

BURN in Print

TWO NEW PUBLICATIONS: BURN and NOMADS

For everyone who has been following Magnum photographer DAVID ALAN HARVEY‘s award-winning online magazine, BURN, there’s now a print edition in the form of a 300-page book showcasing 25 photographers’ work, including ROGER BALLEN, JAMES NACHTWEY, as well many talented emerging photographers.  (Alex and I were honored to be asked to contribute a selection of photographs from VIOLET ISLE, our joint book on Cuba.) You can see a selection of the work — and read James Estrin’s piece — on the New York Times Lens Blog.  To see page samples from the new book, as well as order your own copy of BURNo1 — an edition of only 1,000 copies — visit the BURN web site.

There’s also a new online travel photography magazine with a twist:  the photographers — including ERNESTO BAZAN and ED KASHI — also supply the writing, in the form of journals, poetry, or other text pieces that accompany their images.  Called NOMADS, this beautifully designed, thoughtful, and often visually surprising online magazine is the brainchild of the insightful photographer/educator LAURI LYONS and her talented staff.  –Rebecca Norris Webb

NOMADS online magazine, cover of the first issue

TWO OPENINGS: NEW YORK CITY

Slota/LaBute collaboration, Ricco Maresca Gallery, NY

 

We wanted to note the opening of two exhibitions this week, both on THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21.

At RICCO MARESCA GALLERY, photographer GERALD SLOTA collaborates with the playwright, screenwriter, and film director, NEIL LABUTE.  Apparently the two of them met via email and decided to collaborate, creating a series of strange greeting cards, wherein LaBute would attempt to probe Slota’s psyche, and Slota would respond to Labute’s words in the form of images.  Slota’s photographs often push the edge of photographic technique, often distressing the image, by scratching on it or adding to it.  His work can be darkly psychological — as can the work of LaBute, who’s been called “America’s misanthrope par excellence” by the UK’s Independent. You can read more about the Slota/LaBute collaboration in the current issue of Fluence.

At 601 ARTSPACE, ROBERT BLAKE, formerly director of the General Studies Program at ICP, has curated a show of the work of JOE RODRIGUEZ and MARTIN WEBER, entitled “Cultural Memory Matters.” Both these photographers in very different ways have explored some of the issues surrounding cultural identity and heritage.  While Rodriguez, born in Brooklyn of Puerto Rican descent, approaches the world in a traditional documentary manner, photographing life as played out in front of the camera, Weber, from Argentina, often uses text pieces in the images, transforming or qualifying the viewer’s understanding of the photograph.  It should be interesting to see their work side by side.–Alex Webb


Rodriguez/Weber in "Cultural Memory Matters" at 601 ArtSpace

TWO MORE:  THE SHORT LIST

ALIA MALLEY has work in the SHFT New York pop-up gallery show, 112 Greene St., between Prince and Spring Streets, which opens on Thursday, October 21st, from 6-8pm.

RAJIV KAPOOR has an exhibit, “Paradoxes of Living on Holy Land,” at Seattle University’s Vachon & Kinsey Galleries, which is up through December 3.

TWO EVENTS:  New Photography Festival in Pennsylvania

Alex Webb, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1988, from "The Sunshine State"

We hope some of you can join us at a new photography festival, called INVISION, the first weekend in NOVEMBER, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, a short drive/bus ride from NEW YORK.  On Saturday evening, November 6, I will show a selection of work — featuring some of Rebecca’s photographs, too — as part of a weekend of photography with presentations by LARRY FINK, NICK NICHOLS, and PETER VAN AGTMAEL.

On Sunday, NOVEMBER 7, Rebecca and I, joined by others from the photography world, will conduct a series of portfolio reviews. (We understand there are only 30 slots available.)–Alex Webb

Rebecca Norris Webb, "After the Fire," Hermosa, SD, 2010, from "My Dakota"

 


TWO VIEWS:  Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon, from "Line-Up" exhibition at Robert Mann Gallery, NY

 

If you’re in New York, this is the last week to visit the JULIE BLACKMON show, LINE-UP, at the ROBERT MANN GALLERY, which is up through Saturday, October 23d.   Julie, like me, is the member of a large family — although, unlike me, she is the eldest of nine children, and I’m in the middle of five — and, when looking at her photographs in this exhibition, one can’t help but be transported back to one’s own childhood, with its terrors and its chaos and its comic antics.  Julie’s genius is that this childhood is seen through the prism of the Dutch Renaissance painters, especially Jan Steen’s domestic scenes,  and her beautiful prints are a mix of the staged, the improvised, and the photo-shopped — you can’t get more 21st Century than that!  Her marvelous first book, Domestic Vacations, is a welcome addition to any photographic library.–Rebecca Norris Webb

Julie Blackmon, from "Line-Up" at the Robert Mann Gallery, NY

A FAREWELL:  Julie Mason

Julie Mason by Julie Oliver, Ottawa Citizen

Alex and I like to think of our photographic workshops as communities, and it is with a heavy heart that I say goodbye to one of our treasured members, JULIE MASON, who died last weekend of ovarian cancer.  To honor Julie’s long commitment to social justice, health, and women’s issues, here is a video tribute to her from the Canadian House of Commons.

Alex and I had the pleasure of working with her on a long-term photographic project at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, as well as with her photographs during the Magnum Workshop in Toronto last May.  Julie, a gifted Canadian writer who was finding her way in her other passion, photography, gave as much — if not more — to Alex and myself, as we probably gave to her.  I was struck by her insights and her compassion and her generosity.  I remember last May after struggling through a presentation of “My Dakota,” an elegy for my brother, Dave, Julie took me aside and quietly mentioned her cancer.  She had not fear in her voice but love.  She was only telling me because she was concerned that her granddaughers, who meant the world to her, wouldn’t remember her.  I told her how important photographs were to my late brother’s two daughers and son.  So, together, we came up with the idea of  a “memory box,” with a mix of her photographs, writings, and momentos of times with her granddaughters to give to each of them.  Whether Julie had the time to create these objects is immaterial.  The memories of Julie, themselves, are the best memory box for any grandchild.

For those who knew Julie, and would like to leave a memory, Alex and I invite you to leave a comment in celebration of her life.  I guess, in a way, this POSTINGS column, is a kind of memory box for Julie.  For spending time in Julie’s presence was a gift to each of us who had the good fortune to have known her — no matter for how long.–Rebecca Norris Webb

TWO EVENTS: Slide Talk and Book Signing

September 22, 2010

AW, Havana, 2008, from "Violet Isle"

Please join us for our joint slide talk, TOGETHER AND APART, at 11 AM in the Ambassador Room on Saturday, September 25th , at the South Dakota Festival of Books in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. We will present a variety of work, including a selection of photographs from our joint book, Violet Isle: A Duet of Photographs from Cuba.  We’ll discuss other bodies of work as well, including some books we’ve worked on together –– such as Istanbul: City of a Hundred Names (photographs by Alex; photo-edited by Rebecca) –– and some books we’ve worked on individually, such as My Dakota (Rebecca’s upcoming book), which is an elegy for Rebecca’s brother who died unexpectedly.   We  will also attend two book signings –– featuring Dave Eggers, Pete Dexter, NPR’s Deborah Amos, among other noted authors –– on Friday and Saturday.–– Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

RNW, Havana, 2008, from "Violet Isle"

MAKING BOOKS: The Photo Project Workshop

August 4, 2010

Alex Webb, Violet Isle book cover, 2009

For photographers working on a long-term project that they are passionate about, consider joining ALEX  WEBB and REBECCA NORRIS WEBB for the PHOTO PROJECT WORKSHOP in New York the last week in October.  One scholarship (reduced tuition) is available for a full-time photography student who is currently working on an undergraduate or graduate photography degree anywhere in the world.  For more information about the workshop, please visit WEBB WORKSHOPS.  Currently, there are only two places left in the workshop.  Hope you can join us.– Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb

Alex Webb, "Istanbul" book cover

Rebecca Norris Webb, "The Glass Between Us" book cover



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